Jul82016

Imprudence Extras: How Primrose Stocks an Airship Medical Cabinet

Primrose is particularly good at her job of ship’s purser (and chief of supplies) aboard the Spotted Custard. Although I will say, Gentle Reader, that in Imprudence, Rue rather stretches her dear friend’s abilities in this arena.

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One of Primrose’s jobs consists of stocking the medicine cabinet on board the Spotted Custard. Lady Maccon is rather infamous for insisting that either vinegar or bicarbonate of soda could solve all of life’s ills, however her daughter is a bit more (shall we say) prudent on these matters.

Victorian Medicine Chest

I’ve listed the items as the Victorians might have. [In brackets is the use or perceived use and/or more modern term.] I hope it goes without saying that this is in no way a suggested medical selection for modern times. However, this is the internet, so I’m saying it.

A Household Medicine Cabinet 1870s ~ 1900

1. Powdered ipecacuanha [induce vomiting]
2. Purgative powder [laxative]
3. Sulphate of quinine [malaria treatment]
4. Chlorodyne [chloroform and morphine tincture] & laudanum [opiate in alcohol, often sherry]
5. Carbolic acid [antiseptic]
6. Castor oil [Ricinus]
7. Eno’s fruit salts
8. One bottle each of M’Kesson and Robbin’s compound podophyllin and aloes and myrrh pills [for warts and verrucas, also purgative]
9. Stick of nitrate of silver [antibacterial, often used in eyes for conjunctivitis, skin infections, ulcers]
10. Cholera pills
11. Iodine [used on rashes and wounds]
12. Tabloids of antipyrin and phenacetin [analgesic and antipyretic]
13. Aspirin [willow bark extract]
14. Salicylate of soda [pain relief, for skin conditions like eczema and psoriasis]
15. Boracic acid [disinfectant]
16. Cough lozenges
17. Tabloids of grey powder [mercury in calk, mainly purgative and antisyphilitic]
18. Kay’s essence of linseed [coughs and colds]
19. Clean undyed squares of cotton, wool, linen
20. Oiled silk
21. Roll of adhesive plaster
22. Bandages [usually linen]
23. Dressing forceps

Medical Provision and Hygiene

Gail’s Sources:

I drew up this list from a combination of sources:

Foote‘s Medical Common Sense and Plain Home Talk (American 1871)

Southgate’s Things A Lady Would Like to Know (English 1876)

Davidson’s Hints to Lady Travellers (English 1889)

Steel & Gardiner’s The Complete Indian Housekeeper and Cook (1898, revised). Steel also includes recipes for common ailments, unfortunately not gun shot wounds.

 

via @photosandbacon  Iron Cordial, King of Tonics, 1886 includes a remedy for being female

 

Other Blog Posts on Victorian Health & Medicine

 

via @photosandbacon

 

Now don’t even get me started on Victorian cosmetics.

Advertisement for Fould’s arsenic complexion wafers by H B Fould in New York, 1901. (Photo by Jay Paull_Getty Images)

 

Want more?

Sample the First Chapter of Imprudence!

{Gail’s monthly read along for July is Poison or Protect by Gail Carriger.}

PROJECT ROUND UP  

  • Romancing the Inventor ~ A Supernatural Society Novella
    Status: Developmental edit. Cover reveal and release date to come.
    LBGT romance featuring a parlormaid bent on seducing a certain cross-dressing inventor who is too brokenhearted to notice. Or is she?
  • Romancing the Werewolf ~ A Supernatural Society Novella
    Status: Outline.
    LBGT reunion romance featuring your favorite reluctant werewolf dandy, the return of a certain quietly efficient Beta, and a very unexpected gift.

OUT NEXT
2Imprudence

Imprudence ~ Custard Protocol Book the Second

Rue and the crew of the Spotted Custard return from India with revelations that shake the foundations of England’s scientific community. Queen Victoria is not amused, the vampires are tetchy, and something is wrong with the local werewolf pack. To top it all off, Rue’s best friend Primrose keeps getting engaged to the most unacceptable military types.

Rue has family problems as well. Her vampire father is angry, her werewolf father is crazy, and her obstreperous mother is both. Worst of all, Rue’s beginning to suspect what they really are… is frightened.

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

1895 via @AngelaKCouch Twitter Parasol, design c.1895-1900

1895 via @AngelaKCouch Twitter Parasol, design c.1895-1900

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

The Bookworm: Part Bookshelf, Part Cocoon Chair

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

Seaside Fashions of the 19th Century

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

Overcoming Awkward Fear of the Romance Genre

Book News:

Interview on No Don’t Die

Quote of the Day:

“I expect I shall feel better after tea.”

~ P.G. Wodehouse, Carry on, Jeeves

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Posted by Gail Carriger

3 Responses

  1. Becky said:

    “…more dead than normal…” Bwahaha!! 🙂 Oh what a tease you are! Come on 19th!! Can’t wait!

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