Tagged Gail Carriger Recommends

Queer YA Reading List: What the Author Abandons the Reader Keeps Pursuing (Miss Carriger Recommends)

Posted by Gail Carriger

As an Author I’ve been out of the YA world for a while (Manners came out in 2015).

However, I rarely leave YA for long as a reader.

That’s one if the best things about being both, I can’t write fast enough to write all the things I want to write. But I’m a pretty darn fast reader.

Anyway, I hauled myself into Books Inc on Friday for an intimate gathering all about queer YA sci-fi & fantasy,

All my fellow authors were more and better versed than I on the subject. So here’s some awesome suggestions to get you started, and, of course, I’m always delighted to hear your recommendations.

Timekeeper by Tara Sim

In an alternate Victorian world controlled by clock towers, a damaged clock can fracture time—and a destroyed one can stop it completely. 

Danny is a prodigy who can repair both clockwork and fabric of time, however an obsession with rescuing his father causes him to be given the worst possible assignment and a secretive, aluring assistant.

Not Your Sidekick by CB Lee

Welcome to Andover, where superpowers are common, but internships are complicated.

Despite her heroic lineage, Jessica Tran is resigned to a life without superpowers and is merely looking to beef up her college applications when she stumbles upon the perfect (paid!) internship—only it turns out to be for the town’s most heinous supervillain. On the upside, she gets to work with her longtime secret crush, Abby, whom Jess thinks may have a secret of her own.

Willful Machines by Tim Floreen

In the near future, an artificial human transfers her consciousness to the Internet and begins terrorizing the American public.

The closeted son of an ultra-conservative president must keep a budding romance secret from his father while protecting himself from a sentient computer program that’s terrorizing the United States—and has zeroed in on him as its next target—in this “socially conscious sci-fi thriller to shelve between The Terminator and Romeo & Juliet” (Kirkus, starred review).

Lunav by Jenn Polish

Without faerie Dreams, the dragons won’t survive. And neither will anyone else.

Brash, boyish sixteen-year-old Sadie uses her half-human status to spy on the human monarchy, who’ve made it illegal to Dream. But spying is a risky business. Still, Sadie thought she was a pro until they sent a new human magistrate to the Grove. Evelyn.

I think this is a good range of options, some superhero, some steampunk, some sci fi, and some fantasy. All YA. Go forth and enjoy!

More?

24 Queer YA Books Coming Out Summer 2018

38 Best LGBTQ YA Novels

This is your warning that many of these are going to be darker than my stuff. Because, let’s be frank here, almost EVERYTHING is darker than my stuff.

Yours as ever,

Miss Gail

OUT NOW!

Amazon (print) | Kobo | B&N (print) | iBooks 

Direct from Gail (Optional Signed Edition) 

How to Marry a Werewolf (In 10 Easy Steps) ~ A Claw & Courtship Novella by Gail Carriger features a certain white wolf we all love to hate (except those of us weirdos who love to love him).

Guilty of an indiscretion? Time to marry a werewolf.

Rejected by her family, Faith crosses the Atlantic, looking for a marriage of convenience and revenge. But things are done differently in London. Werewolves are civilized. At least they pretend to be.

UPCOMING SCRIBBLES

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

Allen & Ginter (American, Richmond, Virginia)
Forward, March, from the Parasol Drills series (N18) for Allen & Ginter Cigarettes Brands, 1888

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

What the Heck is GDPR? (and How to Make Sure Your Blog Is Compliant)

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

Frequently Used Words In Fantasy Titles

Book News:

Quote of the Day:

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? Wiki that sheez!


This is Why Gail Didn’t Love Love, Simon & Some Alternative Options (Miss Carriger Recommends)

Posted by Gail Carriger

My dearest Gentle Reader, I finally went to see Love, Simon and I have a few thoughts.

I don’t wanna get into a debate or impinge on anyone’s feelings about this movie (you are utterly entitled to your own opinion and should not be influenced by mine).

Please note that in my (home) blog post I will not approve comments that are spoilers or crack open said debate, use your own platform for that, please.

So, if you haven’t seen it or you really adored it, then you might want to skip to the bottom of this blog post, Other Options, for more movie recs.

Love, Simon

I don’t go to movies often, it’s hard to make time, but I really wanted to support this one so I managed to make it to a matinee showing on the very last day available in my area. Apparently I’m not alone in wanting to show support. I was, however, alone in the theater.

Couldn’t have asked for a better viewing.

I had really high expectations.

I agree with general concerns over the sanitized nature of this movie. However, the very clean prettiness of the presentation made it feel retro to me, like something vaguely John Hughes.

For me that’s not necessarily a bad thing. Because the flip size of objecting to the sanitization and retro feel, is the need for queer normalization (no, don’t get bristly with me, you’re still a unique special sequined love-ball, they just need help to get them there, OK?)

My point is, something bright and shiny and sweet (and yes, sanitized) slides in under the radar. It will be shown in theaters across the country and not just in arthouses in major cities. In that, I give  Love, Simon props. It’s fighting, just not with knives.

See Gail talk about the power and subversive nature of comedy in this blog post. 

However…

Gail Gets Embarrassed for Characters

I found it super cringe-worthy at points. I wanted desperately to fast forward several parts, instead I ended up just covering my face with my hands.

I don’t like to be embarrassed for the characters on the screen, I still flinch when I even think about the film Mermaids. So this kind of thing makes me particularly uncomfortable.

Dialogue

The dialogue was not as snappy or witty as I’d hoped. I wanted something a little more like Mean Girls, 10 Things I Hate About You, Bend it Like Beckham, Clueless, or even She’s the Man (only, you know, GAY). In terms of writing, I’d even have settled for something more classic old school poignant-meets-cheese like Breakfast Club.

The dialogue in Love, Simon was, well, fine. Dull.

Not quotable, but, you know, there, I guess?

The Crux

My biggest issue is kind of a spoiler but I think I can be euphemistic enough to articulate in a way that only those who’ve seen in the movie will understand.

It has to do with the ferris wheel at the end.

I was a pretty upset to see Simon do unto Blue basically what Martin just did to Simon. He took away Blue’s agency in a pivotal life choice. It was social pressure, meant nicely, but still social pressure. While the nature of intent is open to debate, Simion essentially forces choice onto another. Blue should have had the option to make his choice in his own time without the empathy-pressure of Simon’s immanent humiliation hanging over Blue’s personal decision.

Sweet and romantic as I found Simon’s grand sappy gesture, that part really messed with my head. I don’t know if I’ll be able to forgive the movie for it.

Final Thoughts

In the end, I did enjoy it. I found it sweet and the characters were likable, and the romance was satisfying but that last plot point was a doozy.

I understand Love, Simon’s importance to the zeitgeist. I do. Tumblr alone has opened my eyes quite a bit.

But in the end?

I’m conflicted.

How unsatisfying, Miss Gail!

Update: 8.14.18 ~ I Read The Book!

I finally picked up and read Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda. Which I very much enjoyed. All of my concerns and reservations and issues with the movie do not exist in the book, so HOORAY!

I will still die on the alter of The Geography Club or Boy Meets Boy, as I like both of those slightly better, but it’s a good book. Very enjoyable.

If you like the movie I think you will probably LIKE THE BOOK MRE. So go read it, m’kay?

Goodreads Review here.

Other Options!

If you liked Love, Simon you might also enjoy these. Or if you had some of the concerns I did with that movie, you might prefer these.

High School Setting

Were the World Mine ~ Streaming right now on Prime, this is the only movie I know (off the top of my head) that’s also a gay romance set in high school. However, I wouldn’t call it a comedy. It’s a slightly surreal romantic drama musical.Some consent issues – Shakespeare’s fault. To me, it feels like it owes more to a more cerebral movie like Flirting, than anything else. Bonus glitter… lots of glitter.

Alex Strangelove ~ A charmingly awkward geeky boy who thinks he’s found the love of his life in his lovely high-school girlfriend, begins to questions everything when he meets an adorable boy. This is more about the internal struggle of coming out and hurting the ones you love, than the external exhibition of admitting to queerness, like Love, Simon. Bonus indie music… the good kind. (It’s on netflix.)

The Geography Club ~ Slightly more honest to its book than Love, Simon, this one is more about self discovery and friendship than romance. Inf act it’s isn’t a romance at all. It has a jock focus and since I happen to love American football, I like that part. If you’re warm squishes are about found family rather than first kisses, than this is for you.

After High School

One of the reasons that Love, Simon is so important is that it’s a high school set romantic comedy with gay characters. And I get that, I do. It’s a favorite setting of mine, obviously. But here are some movies that tackle some similar themes in a slightly more adult setting.

Shelter

Shelter ~ Just post high school this features adorable surfer dudes, familial responsibility, honor, duty, and painful coming out. Bonus points from one of my favorite romance tropes: finding love with the brother of the best friend.

Later Days

Latter Days ~ One of my favorite all times movies. I features: a repressed Mormon, dramatic indie songs, unfair mistreatment by the ignorant, reformed bad boy, with bonus Tara from Buffy.

The scene when he drops the tray. I mean, come ON. So good.

Big Eden

Big Eden ~ This feels like a real romance. Yes there are quirky characters, but they’re so much more honest than Hollywood usually allows in terms of complexity, appearance, vocabulary, everything. Bonus cooking = love!

I have a blog post all about Queer Romantic Comedy Movies that includes these movies plus lesbian and trans romantic comedies. Check it you if you want some ladies in your gay.

Conall Feels Pretty Fan Art

Queer in Your Ears

From ace-artemis-fanartist

Book Recommendations

Like the book, Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda?

Try…

(Last two not available as ebooks because someone around their production is an idiot.)

My Super Queer Stuff:

More to come!

OUT MAY 13, 2018!

Amazon | Kobo | B&N | iBooks | Direct from Gail

How to Marry a Werewolf (In 10 Easy Steps) ~ A Claw & Courtship Novella by Gail Carriger is now awabile (print, audio & other editions will follow). Featuring a certain white wolf we all love to hate (except those of us weirdos who love to love him). Add this book on Goodreads.

Guilty of an indiscretion? Time to marry a werewolf.

Rejected by her family, Faith crosses the Atlantic, looking for a marriage of convenience and revenge. But things are done differently in London. Werewolves are civilized. At least they pretend to be.

UPCOMING SCRIBBLES

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

Image that influenced lesbian side characters Lady Flo and Jane in Poison or Protect 1862 Title- Ladies’ Companion Date- Thursday, May 1, 1862 Item ID- v. 42, plate 86

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

Book News:

Darque Dreamer Reads says :

Curtsies & Conspiracies offered everything Etiquette & Espionage did. It had humor, whit, ridiculously fun antics, and vivaciously dynamic characters. It also offered plenty of gadgets and gizmos, important lessons on espionage and character assassination, and vivid descriptions of dirigibles and the wonderful world of The Finishing School.”

FS C&C Foreign Editions

Quote of the Day:

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? There’s a wiki for that!


Gail’s First Book Meme (Miss Carriger Recommends)

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

This meme came up on Tumblr recently, Gentle Reader. I thought it was fun, so I decided to play along.

Book that made me cry:

Watership Down. I still haven’t forgiven it.

Book that was spoiled for me:

Most everything.

I like spoilers and actively seek them out, always have. I am the girl that picks up the book and flips to the end to ensure it ends happily. Blame Watership Down.

First book I fell in love with:

Molly Moves Out. To this day my mother is troubled by my love for this book.

First time I couldn’t stop smiling because of a book or character:

Probably a Brambly Hedge book.

First person who really impacted my reading:

Aside from various librarians? The BFF Phrannish.

Since then I have developed rather complex taste curator relationships with various internet bloggers, more complex on my end than theirs. As they likely have no idea I exist.

First book hangover:

The Song of the Lioness series. After the last book came out, I did nothing but reread the series for about six months and refused to read anything else in an attempt to deal with the loss. I have had this happen before, but never as badly as this first time.

Do you want more books recommended and spotted on sale? New stuff goes to my Chirrup members first, because I love them bestest. Sign up here.

Coop de Book: Gail’s monthly read along for Feb is Princess Academy by Shannon Hale.

LATEST RELEASE!

Amazon | Kobo | B&N | iBooks | Direct

Romancing the Werewolf ~ A Supernatural Society Novella by Gail Carriger is now available (audio will follow).

Gay reunion romance featuring your favorite reluctant werewolf dandy, the return of a certain quietly efficient Beta, and some unexpected holiday gifts.

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

1909 Max Pechstein. (German artist, 1881-1955) Girl in Red with a Parasol

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

1895 Very Silly flower hat for Ivy

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

Harpers Bazaar New York Sat June 13 1891

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

Who will save our bookstores, and the communities they tie together?

Book News:

Tumblr eatingfireflies fan ar Alessandro Tarabotti

Quote of the Day:

“I was quiet, but I was not blind.”

~ Jane Austen

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? There’s a wiki for that!


This Is Why I Write: 10 Books That Inspired & Formed Gail’s Identity As An Author (Miss Carriger Recommends)

Posted by Gail Carriger

So, Gentle Reader, because I am a lover of reading, I often talk about books here on my blog.

Today is no different, except that I thought I would discuss a few of the books that I feel formed me as a writer not just my taste a reader.

These are the books that drastically impacted not only my psyche as a reader, but how I knew I wanted to entertain readers going forward.

1. Tamora Pierce ~ The Song of the Lioness series

I make no bones about my adoration for Pierce and this series in particular. Look, I am an old fart and this was the first fantasy book (so far I as know) written for a young female audience with a kick ass girl main character. After a childhood of Tolkien and Alexander and Montgomery (much as I love them) Pierce was a revelation. She changed my life by presenting me with my first strong female main character. Period.

2. Gerald Durrell ~ My Family and Other Animals

Durrell is a master of comedy ~ his descriptions, his situations, the absurdity of the British abroad, the ridiculousness of family life. I listened to all these books on tape, over and over and over. If it’s my details on Ivy’s outfits that make you laugh, then that’s the Durrell in me.

3. James Herriot ~ All Creatures Great and Small

I suspect Herriot & Pierce & Durrell combine to influence me into including animals in all of my books. Pets (particularly cats) have always been prevalent in my life. But it was reading these books that taught me they were a source of joy, amusement, and characterization.

4. Mercedes Lackey ~ By the Sword

If Pierce was my introduction for chicks with swords, this books is the pinnacle achievement in that regard. Specifically interesting from the writer’s perspective is that this is a heroine’s journey (not a hero’s) and thus Kero succeeds by building a network and helping her friends (and being helped by them). She learns to be a leader as well as a fighter. (Yes, Pierce eventually wrote Protector of the Small which also does this, but I read By the Sword first).

This book informed my whole approach to empowerment and strength in all my characters. Also Lackey has had (and always will have) queer characters. At the time, this blew my ever-loving little mind. (I have a whole blog post about it.)

5. Diana Wynne Jones ~ Howl’s Moving Castle

Now we are getting to a place where fantasy begins to meld with humor. Jones messes with character tropes in this book so brilliantly, and celebrates peculiarity with such joy. Yes, Terry Pratchett (see Mort ) helped, but this book really opened my eyes to the possibilities. Also the tidiness of the ending, the tightness of the hints and how it all comes back together. She is so brilliant at threading, mistress of the tapestry.

6. Douglas Adams ~ Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy

Those places where my humor gets slapstick, absurd, or surreal all owe themselves to Douglas Adams. I can quote the opening chapter of the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by rote. I listened to the audiobook and a radio play over and over and over again so much, I have huge chunks memorised. If you think there is an oblique reference to this series in one of my books, you are probably right. And it’s probably not that oblique.

7. P.G. Wodehouse ~ Laughing Gas

On the other hand, those places where the humor is entirely character based, where much is made of very minor details, where everything stops for tea and silliness, that owes itself to Wodehouse. Also, all the parody, baby. Again I listened to every single one of the Jeeves books on audiotape as I drove across country during my college years. This stand alone, however, is the funniest. Yes I am aware of the many social issues surrounding Wodehouse, but the man made me cry laughing, I have to give him some kind of credit for that.

8. Jasper Fforde ~ The Eyre Affair

Speaking of… this book. I guess it mainly changed the way I thought about the world, and thought about writing alternate history. The idea that alt-hist didn’t have to be some dark battle goes awry, instead it could be a skewed world more ridiculous than our own. It informed how I conceptualised and thought about the Parasolverse.

9. Elizabeth Vaughan ~ Warprize

I’d given up reading romance for years until I picked this book up. Vaughan based her romantic misunderstanding on culture conflict and two capable characters who just don’t get each other through no fault of their own. I love that. I hate conflict based on two people unwilling to just talk to each other. This book showed me how to do romantic tension right, and I’ve always tried to be good about it ever since. It’s also the first book I read that was 50/50 fantasy and romance. Until I read it, I thought you had to err heavily into one or the other. Turns out, nope.

10. Wrede & Stevermer ~ Sorcery & Cecelia

Possibly the one on this list most like the Parasolverse, this book showed me that comedy of manners could be combined with fantasy. Through reading this story I realized that pace and action can be quiet and refined. Heros can be grumpy and brooding but still bashful and sweet. If the others on this list informed the style of my writing, this one is the heartbeat of my universe.

Do you want more on books I love spotted on sale? Special recommendations go to my Chirrup members, because I love them. Sign up here.

Latest 20 Minute Delay episode is all about how to negotiate hotel food. I know, yech, and yet…

Coop de Book: Gail’s monthly read along for January is Angels Blood (Guild Hunter Book 1) by Nalini Singh.

OUT IN PRINT & DIGITAL & AUDIO!

Amazon | Kobo | B&N | iBooks | Direct

Romancing the Werewolf ~ A Supernatural Society Novella by Gail Carriger is now available (audio will follow).

Gay reunion romance featuring your favorite reluctant werewolf dandy, the return of a certain quietly efficient Beta, and some unexpected holiday gifts.

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

Allen & Ginter (American, Richmond, Virginia)
On Guard, from the Parasol Drills series (N18) for Allen & Ginter Cigarettes Brands, 1888

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

“A home without books is like a room without windows.”

~ Henry Ward Beecher

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

27 Great Websites for Writers

Book News:

Speculative Chic says of The Parasol Protectorate:

“I didn’t know steampunk paranormal romance was a thing until I read these. I’ve been trying to decide if it falls into one category more than the other, but it really sits squarely in the middle of the two. A smart and sexy romance with a werewolf in the middle of a steam-driven Victorian London sounds a little cluttered when you first hear it, but Gail Carriger makes it work.”

Quote of the Day:

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? There’s a wiki for that!


Gail Carriger’s Favorite Holiday Reads ~ Books for Kids & Adults (Miss Carriger Recommends)

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

I’m not a particularly jolly person, Gentle Reader, but I do have a weird love of holiday romances and stories. So if you are like me, I thought I might recommend a few that I recently found, or not so recently as the case may be…

I’ve chosen for a range of ages and taste, because, frankly I’m an eclectic kinda girl.

Winter Story (Age 3 & Up)

Don’t know the Brambly Hedge by Jill Barklem books? OMG they are delightful! (Yes, my dear UK readers, these charming books were never a thing in the USA. We are sad.)

These lovely beautifully illustrated little stories are very, very British. Start your young ones on the path that will inevitably lead to Great British Bake OffYou want the hardcover print editions of these books, trust me. Frankly, I prefer Barklem to Beatrix Potter.

Winter Story is wonderful – the ice ball alone! So cute, such adorable little field mice running about and being so proper and cozy.

The household schematics will knock your socks off, and any kid lucky enough to receive this book as a gift. Warning, they will want all of them. They are all wonderful. And if you can’t get just Winter Story I can highly recommend the Year in Brambly Hedge box set, I grew up with this.

The Dark Is Rising (Age 10 & Up)

This is the second book in the Dark is Rising series, but it was the first one written. Like Narnia, I’m not convinced you must read these in world chronological order, but you can if you wish.

This one is both my favorite and the most winter-centered. I ADORE this book, it’s magical and wonderful and serious and thrilling. Merely thinking about the central poem gives me chills.

Come on say it with me, you know you want to.

When the Dark, comes rising, six shall turn it back;
Three from the circle, three from the track,
Wood, bronze, iron; water, fire, stone;
Five will return, and one go alone.

Argh, it’s SOOOO good. I highly recommend the audio, as that way you know how all the welsh words are pronounced. Before there was JK Rowling we old fools had Susan Cooper. I wasn’t wowed by the movie, don’t bother.

Gay Holiday Romances

Yes, I Found a Jewish One!

For all those who lament the lack of non-Christmas romance this time of year, Eight Nights in December is rather sweet.

Orphaned Lucas figures spending the holidays with his obnoxious roommate’s family in New York City is better than staying alone on campus upstate. He ends up sharing a room again, this time with his roommate’s brother, Nate.

It’s very new-adult, exploring sex for the first time and that kind of thing. The setting is New York, the family is Jewish, the sex is explicit. It’s a bit of a love letter to New York.

And, of course, a Christmas one…

If you want your gay boys with Christmas and a hot friend-of-the-older-brother trope than try Yours For The Holiday by DJ Jamison instead.

Christmas Romance for the Hets

Daniel and the Angel Novella

One of my favorites is a true classic, Daniel and the Angel, I read this story in a paperback collection a million years ago, well before I ever even contemplated writing romance myself. Fortunately, for all of us, it exists as an ebook now!

When wealthy financier D. L. Stewart’s finds an injured woman in the snow in front of his New York City mansion, he has no idea she is the fair Lillian, a big-hearted and somewhat inept fallen angel, sent back to teach him what Christmas is really about.

A delightful tear-jerker that’s almost painfully sweet, I nevertheless still love this one.

BONUS: A Princess for Christmas Movie

I am weak in the face of sappy Christmas movies recommended to me by romances authors on Twitter. (This one then conformed by Drunk Austen. Trust me, just do everything Drunk Austen does. You can thank me later.) So this year I watched A Princess for Christmas (featuring Sam Heughan).

It is plagued with all the flaws of the genre: cliches, bad dialogue, and the child actors are cringe-worthy. BUT I still enjoyed it and there may even have been a little tear. So, spike that nog, or tot that totty with an extra jigger of brandy, sit back, and wallow.

There it is, I hope I have managed to make your holidays a little more fun and romantic or at the very least given you a gift idea or two.

Hugs and happiest of happies!

Yours in cosy tea-riddle and slightly grumpy comfort,

Miss Gail

Do you want more curated on sale book picks? New stuff goes to Chirrup members first, because I love them bestest. Sign up here.

Coop de Book: Gail’s monthly read along for December is The Lightning-Struck Heart by TJ Klune.

OUT IN PRINT & DIGITAL!

Amazon | Kobo | B&N | iBooks | Direct

I Can Read for Miles says of Romancing the Werewolf:

“Guys, it is worth the wait. This novella is delightful. It gave me so many vibes that I got from Soulless.”

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

1905-06, France. via shewhoworshpscarlin tumblr

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

Umbrellas: The More You Know

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

Lilliput Supervises the rough draft of the next San Andreas Shifter book

Book News:

I Smell Sheep says of The Sumage Solution:

“Carriger does a great job of writing horny supernatural males. This is kind of a subjective generalization, but if you’ve read lots of paranormal romance then you know what I’m talking about. Yeah, it’s a genre stereotype, but that is why it tastes soooo good.”

Quote of the Day:

“The secret of life is to appreciate the pleasure of being terribly, terribly deceived.”

~ Oscar Wilde

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? There’s a wiki for that!


Coop De Book Pick & Review ~ TJ Klune’s The Lightning-Struck Heart (Miss Carriger Recommends)

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

Alright, my darling Gentle Reader, I decided to end our reading year on an upswing. For my final book of 2017 I chose The Lightning-Struck Heart by TJ Klune.

Why did you choose this book, Gail?

For those who know my taste you will know this has many things I like. Adorable snarky gay boy main character. Lots of awesome magic. Really fun fantasy setting. But honestly…

It’s hilarious.

No seriously, I was reading it last night and actually crying with laughter.

Well that might have been because is was two in the morning and I was trying not to wake up the AB.

I haven’t laughed this hard since Ridiculous!. Possibly not even then.

The Lightning-Struck Heart is really that funny.

I think we all need to read something this wonderfully irreverent right now.

Need more persuading?

So I resisted reading any more of Klune (despite a killer reputation) because I read Wolfsong.

Let me very clear. Wolfsong is a strangely haunting, brilliant, and poignant gay shifter not-quite romance. But also full of weird character inconsistencies (particularly the motivations behind the love interest) and (to my mind) desperately needed a heavier hand on the developmental edit pass. (For which I get to blame a trad publisher in this instance. Honestly, sometimes I wonder about Dreamspinner.)

Wolfsong was also too long… for me.

(Incidentally, The Sumage Solution narrator Kirt Graves also narrates Wolfsong. Check him out this month’s episode of the Top 2 Botm Podcast. They chat about Kirt narrating The Sumage Solution, audio narration, and he geeks out about drag queens.)

Back to Klune…

Reading The Lightning-Struck Heart, I realize that Klune may simply write epic length stuff. This one is kicking it on the order of 400 pages, which explains the $18 price tag for trade paperback. 

There is nothing objectively wrong with long, it’s just not to my taste. Instead of gobbling the book up in one weekend (my normal habit – we all have vices) a Klune book will take me several days.

So treat yourself, it’s so worth it. Try the sample, see if you don’t snort with laughter at least once.

Betcha can’t stop…

Yours,

Miss Gail

Do you want more book recs and sale deals? Extra picks go to my Chirrup members, because I love them bestest. Sign up here.

P.S. Chirrup members are getting a chance to win one of three very limited Soulless hard covers from Subterranean Press this month. If you join before the next one goes out on Sunday, you too can enter.

Coop de Book: Gail’s monthly read along for December is The Lightning-Struck Heart (Tales From Verania Book 1) by TJ Klune.

OUT NOW!

Amazon | Kobo | B&N | iBooks | Direct

Romancing the Werewolf ~ A Supernatural Society Novella by Gail Carriger is now available (audio will follow).

Gay reunion romance featuring your favorite reluctant werewolf dandy, the return of a certain quietly efficient Beta, and some unexpected holiday gifts.

Love Bytes Reviews says of Romancing the Werewolf:

“It was funny and sweet, with just a dash of the odd that makes Carriger’s books so worth reading.”

 

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

Allen & Ginter (American, Richmond, Virginia)
Halt, from the Parasol Drills series (N18) for Allen & Ginter Cigarettes Brands, 1888

This reminds me of Irene’s carriage dress in Forsyte Saga.

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

20 Minute Delay latest episode is all about packing!

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

Five Ways to Touch Your Favorite Author’s Heart

Book News:

Beyond the Trope Interview’s Yours Truly:
Direct Link
iTunes
Stitcher

Quote of the Day:

“I need to send you squash in kimono!”

~ Secilia on Twitter (Don’t get it, read Romancing the Werewolf)

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? There’s a wiki for that!


Gift Ideas from Gail Carriger (Miss Carriger Recommends)

Posted by Gail Carriger

OK OK, so the holidays are upon us and I aim to take some of the shopping misery away, Gentle Reader. So here are some fun gift ideas for you, Gentle Reader, or for you to give others.

Amazon Stuff

For those of you who like Amazon, I made it easy on you with lists!

Top Picks of things I basically just love: household, pretty, cozy & silly

 

Gifts for the Reader or Writer in your life

All things Tea Related

 

Ceramic Cup with Tea Infuser and Lid

Traveler Necessities & Loves (tried and tested)

 

Books for a young reader?

Want her to grow up strong? Want him to have good female role models? This list is for you!

For example…


Mara, Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw

Books for those who love the Parasolverse?

For example…

The Forgotten Beasts of Eld by Patricia A. McKillip (Author),‎ Gail Carriger (Preface)

Hate Amazon?

Well you can support me, and a fantastic female owned & run small business, and please any Finishing School fan with a Bumbersnoot or bladed fan necklace.

There are also some fun mugs & shirts and things in my Zazzle shop:

In the UK?

The Cheese Society has a subscription service!

The Lego Shop has Women of NASA

Tired of spending all that money? Want free goodies? Chirrup members often get to enter for beautiful books & goodie boxes, because I love them bestest. Sign up here.

Coop de Book: Gail’s monthly read along for November is Romancing the Werewolf.

OUT NOW!

Amazon | Kobo | B&N | iBooks | Direct

Romancing the Werewolf ~ A Supernatural Society Novella by Gail Carriger is now available (audio will follow).

Gay reunion romance featuring your favorite reluctant werewolf dandy, the return of a certain quietly efficient Beta, and some unexpected holiday gifts.

The Lit Bitch says of Romancing the Werewolf:

“Carriger always does such a classy job at writing gay or lesbian romances. They are never tacky or written for ‘shock’ value. They are always well constructed, thought out, tender, and believable. There is clear feeling behind the romance and I love how the genuine-ness of the romance shines through the social stigma.”

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

Allen & Ginter (American, Richmond, Virginia)
Best Company, from the Parasol Drills series (N18) for Allen & Ginter Cigarettes Brands, 1888

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

Book News:

Borderlands has all my books SIGNED right now, call or email to have one mailed worldwide.

Quote of the Day:

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? There’s a wiki for that!

 


Coop de Book ~ Forgotten Beasts of Eld, Gail’s Desert Island Read (Miss Carriger Recommends)

Posted by Gail Carriger

A little while I go I was immeasurably honored to be asked to write the foreword for the recent re-release of Patricia McKillip’s remarkable Forgotten Beasts of Eld.

This is one of my favorite books of all time. The re-release is now available, and because it is also finally in ebook form (also in audio), I’ve chosen it for our book group read along.

The edition I had as a child.

I thought instead of the usual “I chose this why” post for this book pick, I’d present the forward for you.

I can’t say it better than I already said it.

As it were.

Foreword

Gail Carriger

When I was much younger, my friends and I would challenge ourselves with the hardest question ever asked of any avid reader:

Which book would you want with you if you were stranded on a desert island?

There were a lot of books I loved back then, and a lot of new books have been added to that list-of-adored over the years. But after the first time I read The Forgotten Beasts of Eld, it became the answer to this question, always and forever. Thirty years later, it’s still the answer.
So now I am left with a very difficult task. How do I explain my love for this perfect desert-island book?

The Forgotten Beasts of Eld is like no fantasy novel you have ever read before, and yet it is a touchstone for all of them. It’s not just that the story is magic — it’s that the prose itself is magical and heart-wrenching. Not only will you become immersed in plot and character but also sentence structure. McKillip forms a stunning union of what is told and what is portrayed, and how a writer can transcribe both. It’s like fractal mathematics: beautiful, impossible for an ordinary human to quite understand, and yet hypnotic. Just the opening paragraph is chilling, and thrilling, and all sort of other trilling llls in a row. I can’t describe this book, because it is better than that. It’s better than my capacity for description. It’s not funny, or cute, or silly — it is a work of pure lyrical genius.

This book is the Arthurian legend for an alternate human timeline. It is a riddle teasing you to understand power—in sorcery, in arms, in passion, in knowledge. It is a philosophical treatise on the petty wars of man and how they spin and weave their own magic over intellect and desire. It is about the price of forgiveness, the cost of revenge, and gentle, tentative, nurturing love in all its varied forms.

McKillip explores what it means to be a woman with power beyond the world of men, and then within it. In doing so, she illuminates how we turn ourselves into weapons — not so much how the act of being a weapon is flawed but how in choosing to become one, we risk losing our true selves.

And she does all this while still entertaining.

If you are about to read The Forgotten Beasts of Eld for the first time, I envy you. If this is a reread for you, as it is for me, I know without a shadow of a doubt you will find something new in its pages. I always do.

The Forgotten Beasts of Eld is not just a book about magic — it is magic.

{Coop de Book: Gail’s monthly read along for September is The Forgotten Beasts of Eld by Patricia McKillip.}

NOW IN DIGITAL, PRINT & AUDIO!

The Sumage Solution: San Andreas Shifters #1 by G. L. Carriger, now in all editions.
Contemporary m/m paranormal romance featuring a snarky mage and a gruff werewolf. Hella raunchy. Super dirty. Very very fun. Spin off of Marine Biology.

Can a gentle werewolf heal the heart of a smart-mouthed mage?

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

How to Make Hard Boiled Eggs That Will Peel, Damn It

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

How to Add Google Analytics to WordPress in 5 Minutes or Less

Book News:

BJ’s Reviews says of Poison or Protect audiobook:

“Suzanne Lavington narrated Poison or Protect. This was my first experience with Ms. Lavington and I generally enjoyed her pleasing voice. She also did a good job with varying her pitch to provide differentiation among the characters, including by producing deep enough sounding voices to convincingly sound male, a trait which can be a difficult feat for some female narrators. Ms. Lavington also did a good job with creating accents as both British and Scottish sounding accents are necessary for this story.”

Quote of the Day:

Bingo uttered a stricken woofle like a bull-dog that has been refused cake.”

~ P.G. Wodehouse

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? There’s a wiki for that!


Coop de Book Review ~ The Blue Sword (Miss Carriger Recommends)

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

When people talk about The Blue Sword, Gentle Reader, they often feel compelled to mention The Hero and the Crown. These two books are intimately connected, although each stands alone (the one is a legend in the other).

There are many out there who think The Hero and the Crown the better book. I genuinely like them both, but I read The Blue Sword first and Hari is my one true love.

Alanna was my first girl with a sword and magic, Hari was the first one I felt was like me.

That’s part of it.

I also always liked the romance line better in The Blue Sword. There’s something remarkable in that, because for most of this book the two leads are separated. Yet I believe in their love unquestionably.

Also I find the story is closer, more character driven, and more intimate in Blue. Hero always felt a bit more like a legend being told around a fireplace ~ a little distanced, as if I were watching the characters from far above.

{Coop de Book: Gail’s monthly read along for September is The Forgotten Beasts of Eld by Patricia McKillip.}

NOW IN DIGITAL, PRINT & AUDIO!

The Sumage Solution: San Andreas Shifters #1 by G. L. Carriger, now also in audio.
Contemporary m/m paranormal romance featuring a snarky mage and a gruff werewolf. Hella raunchy. Super dirty. Very very fun. Spin off of Marine Biology.

Can a gentle werewolf heal the heart of a smart-mouthed mage?

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

(c) Aberdeen Art Gallery & Museums; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

Behind the Scenes at The Costume Institute Conservation Laboratory: House of Worth Ball Gown

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

Freelance Achievement Stickers

Book News:

Cover art pose similarity, the hip cock elbow

Stephanie of Cover2Cover Blog says of Curtsies & Conspiracies:

“I really love how the girls always get into a mess and have to work their way out of it – strong females are wonderful. I also loved the humor, there is always the comic relief of a mechanical wiener dog if nothing else. Bumbersnoot makes me giggle and I love it.”

Quote of the Day:

“Editing to do list today includes “organize & pain” as opposed to “organize & plan.” Same difference, I suppose.”

~ Self

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? There’s a wiki for that!


Gail Talks About Food: Her Perfect Meal (Miss Carriger Recommends)

Posted by Gail Carriger

A little while ago, Gentle Reader, I threw the door open to the Parasol Protectorate Fan Group for questions and Amber asked me a doozy.

If you could assemble an ideal x course meal, what would you want it to be? And if you had to prepare it, would it change significantly?

So, first of all I answered part of this for Lawrence over on his:

Eating Authors series

 

1925 Esther Borough Johnson (British artist, 1867-1949) Tea Table in the Garden

My Best Meal Ever

The best meal I ever ate was in Monterosso al Mare, (one of the five tiny towns that make up Cinque Terre on the Italian Riveria). I was there on the four day break we got in the middle of excavation season (July 1995) with three other archaeology undergraduates.

We wandered into this little restaurant, I don’t recall the name. All I remember is we walked down, so the windows were at street level and we got a view of everyone’s shoes as we ate. We started with prosciutto e melone (which was more amazing than any before or since) and then we ate this risotto seafood dish ~ fruite de mar. It was as if they had taken a net and scraped it across the sea floor ~ crayfish, clams, mussels, oysters, white fish, salmon, and fresh veggies scattered over this amazing rice. The seafood was cooked perfectly, fresh and glistening. The onion and tomato rice was gooey in the center and backed crisp and crunchy on the top. We had a bottle of cheap Chianti to go with… magic.

My Comfort Meal

My all time favorite comfort meal is the peppered alpaca stake at Cafe Manu in Cuzco, Peru. Alpaca is like the Kobe beef of the pork world. It is amazing when cooked correctly. This is a non-traditional preparation, served wrapped in bacon with a French peppered cream sauce and a simple baked potato. I ate it with a pint of maracuja juice (passion fruit) and life was good. Anytime I excavated near Cuzco I always tried to visit to eat this dish.

This would be what I asked for as my last meal.

My Desert

Layered Raspberry Pavlova at the Lord Nelson in Topsham, Devon. Meringue cooked the British way, crisp on the outside and gooey in the middle, with fresh raspberries and clotted cream sandwiched in between the meringue layers and a raspberry sauce reduction drizzled about. With a nice pot of tea? Heaven. Pure heaven.

My 4 Courses

  1. The prosciutto e melone from Tuscany with a glass of prosecco.
  2. Appetizer portions of the rice and seafood from Monterosso with cold fresh water.
  3. Alpaca pepper steak, wilted chard, and papa rellena with passion fruit juice.
  4. Raspberry pavlova to finish with a perfect pot of tea.

As I told Lawrence, there are some who speculate I chose a career as an archaeologist so I could eat my way around exotic locations. Now I often decide whether I should visit a city for a book event based on the local food scene.

Would this meal change if I had to cook it myself?

Absolutely. I can’t get many of the ingredients and I accept no substitutes. Generally speaking I already cook for myself the things I want to eat and have the time to make (excepting deserts) so yeah…

I’d rather eat out, tho.

I love eating out.

{Coop de Book: Gail’s monthly read along for July is The Blue Sword by Robin McKinley.}

NOW IN DIGITAL, PRINT & AUDIO!

The Sumage Solution: San Andreas Shifters #1 by G. L. Carriger, now also in audio.
Contemporary m/m paranormal romance featuring a snarky mage and a gruff werewolf. Hella raunchy. Super dirty. Very very fun. Spin off of Marine Biology.

Can a gentle werewolf heal the heart of a smart-mouthed mage?

Boy Meets Boy says:

“If you like a good shifter story, this is the book for you. If you like witty banter and shenanigans, this is the book for you. If you like a story with depth and angst and romance, this is the book for you. Hell, if you like to read, this is the book for you. Cause, really, you can’t go wrong with this story.”

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

Allen & Ginter (American, Richmond, Virginia) From the Parasol Drills series (N18) for Allen & Ginter Cigarettes Brands, 1888

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

Steampunk Curse Generator

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

Back Up Your Work

Book News:

10 Top Summer Reads for Middle-School GirlsEtiquette & Espionage made the list!

Quote of the Day:

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? There’s a wiki for that!


Gail Carriger Reviews MT Anderson’s Feed (Miss Carriger Recommends)

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

Because MT Anderson’s Feed is on sale today in the USA for $1.99 I’m hijacking my own blog, Gentle Reader, to review it.

If you were to choose only one YA book to read in your lifetime, it should be this book.

Feed portrays the near future world North Americans are currently barreling towards, and, as a result, this book is horrifying, terrifying, and brilliant all at the same time. You don’t need to read my review, you need to go out and read this book, now. It’s a fast pace and shouldn’t take very long to whip through. I keep it on my shelf because it’s genius, but it’s so chilling I can’t stand to reread it. (But you know what, I’m still going to buy the ebook so I have it with me, just in case I need it.)

It’s not often I agree with the big gun awards out there but Feed richly deserves its status as: National Book Award Finalist, star PW, and star Kirkus, it should have won the Newbery. Probably would have if it wasn’t SF.

{Coop de Book: Gail’s monthly read along for July 2017  is The Blue Sword by Robin McKinley.}

NOW IN DIGITAL, PRINT & AUDIO!

The Sumage Solution: San Andreas Shifters #1 by G. L. Carriger, now also in audio.
Contemporary m/m paranormal romance featuring a snarky mage and a gruff werewolf. Hella raunchy. Super dirty. Very very fun. Spin off of Marine Biology.

Can a gentle werewolf heal the heart of a smart-mouthed mage?

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

1900s Jules Bastien-Lepage (French artist, 1848–1884) Girl with a Parasol

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

The Dandies of White’s in the Regency Era

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

10 Things You Should Know About Having a Persona

Book News:

The Many Face of Alexia, T-B, L-R: Japan, Spain, Omnibus, USA, Germany, Manga

Quote of the Day:

“Sunday supper, unless done on a large and informal scale, is probably the most depressing meal in existence. There is a chill discomfort in the round of beef, an icy severity about the open jam tart. The blancmange shivers miserably.”

~ P.G. Wodehouse

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? There’s a wiki for that!


10 Things Gail Hates That Everyone Else Loves (Miss Carrier Recommends)

Posted by Gail Carriger

For the sake of nothing else but my own amusement, Gentle Reader, here’s a Listical featuring the ten things I really do not like that everyone else seems to adore…

  1. Jets/bubbles on in hot tubs (those Jacuzzi brothers have a lot to answer for)
  2. Earl Grey Tea
  3. Firm mattresses
  4. Too many choices at a restaurant
  5. Designer labels
  6. Christmas music
  7. Mood lighting
  8. Puffy pillows
  9. Naps
  10. High tech fabrics

Bonus, 4 things Miss Carriger doesn’t mind that everyone else seems to hate…

  1. Long flights
  2. Short books
  3. Spreadsheets
  4. Color coding

{Coop de Book: Gail’s monthly read along for July 2017 is The Blue Sword by Robin McKinley.}

NOW IN DIGITAL, PRINT & AUDIO!

The Sumage Solution: San Andreas Shifters #1 by G. L. Carriger, now also in audio.
Contemporary m/m paranormal romance featuring a snarky mage and a gruff werewolf. Hella raunchy. Super dirty. Very very fun. Spin off of Marine Biology.

Can a gentle werewolf heal the heart of a smart-mouthed mage?

Rally the Readers says:

“The Sumage Solution is set in modern day San Francisco and is one smoking, scorching, smoldering paranormal romance. This might be the closest my Kindle Fire has ever come to, well, catching fire.”

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

1900s antique-royals tumblr

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

A Rare Look Inside Victorian Houses From The 1800s (13 Photos)

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

Admitting to Writing

Book News:

G.L. Carriger Guest Blog on I Smell Sheep

Quote of the Day:

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? There’s a wiki for that!


© 2019 Gail Carriger | Disclaimer & Privacy Policy | Site built by Todd Jackson