Tagged Steampunk

Victorian Slang for Lord Akeldama (Parasol Protectorate Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

1811 Slang for Lord Akeldama

  • Backgammon player ~ A sodomite
  • A bang up cove ~ A dashing fellow who spends his money freely
  • Bachelor’s faire ~ Bread and cheese and kisses
  • Blanket hornpipe or Buttock ball ~ The amorous congress
  • Pink of the fashion ~ The top of the mode
  • Prinking ~ Dressing over nicely; prinked up as if he came out of a bandbox, or fit to sit upon a cupboard’s head
  • Twiddle poop ~ An effeminate looking fellow
  • In twig ~ Handsome or stylish
  • Gaying instrument ~ The penis
  • Jessamy ~ A smart jemmy fellow, a fopling

~ 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue 

As the swell’s rattler and prades are bang up prime; the gentleman sports an elegant carriage and fine horses.

Banyan  1760s  The Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Banyans were comfortable robes worn by men while relaxing at home.

{Gail’s monthly read along for July is: Passion Blue by Victoria Strauss}

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

via antique-royals tumblr

Your Infusion of Cute . . .
A Visual Tour of Monterey Bay Aquarium

Your Tisane of Smart . . .
“In the 1830s and 1840s three waves of contagious diseases had swept across the country: from 1831 to 1833 there were two influenza epidemics, and the first-ever outbreak of cholera in Britain, which alone killed 52,000; from 1836 to 1842 there were epidemics of influenza, typhus, smallpox and scarlet fever; from 1846 to 1849 came typhus, typhoid and cholera again. These three waves of death had a devastating impact on a terrified population that had thought that, with the smallpox vaccination and some success against diseases like diphtheria, epidemic death might be on the wane.”
~ The Victorian House by Judith Flanders

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

via @History_Pics on Twitter Malling-Hansen Writing Ball, the 19th century proto-typewriter that Nietzsche used to type up some 60 manuscripts

Book News:
A.F. Grappin of One More Full Page says of Etiquette & Espionage:

“I can’t rave enough about this book. I’d heard about it, and it blew my expectations out of the water. From the beginning (the trifle incident) to the very end, I was hooked. This is a wonderful introduction to steampunk for younger readers, and Sophronia and her schoolmates (and other friends who aren’t her classmates) make a great team that I think young adults of all ages can get attached to.”

Quote of the Day:
“They stand round, with soap locks and scented pocket-handkerchiefs, tipping their hats to the ladies.”
~ Around the Tea Table by T. De Witt Talmage (1875)


Alternate Historical Names for Clothing in the Victorian Era (Finishing School Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

1811 ~ Alternate Historical Names for Clothing

  • Togs ~ Clothes
  • Articles or Inexpressibles ~ Underthings, sometimes Breeches
  • Farting crackers or Galligaskins ~ Breeches
  • Buntlings ~ Petticoats
  • Fallalls ~ Ornaments, chiefly woman’s, such as ribands, necklaces, etc.
  • India wipe ~ A silk handkerchief
  • Specked whiper ~ A coloured handkerchief
  • Knuckle-dabd, or knuckle-confounders ~ Ruffles
  • Brogue ~ A particular kind of shoe without a heel, worn in Ireland
  • Rum nab ~ A good hat
  • An old ewe, drest lamb fashion ~ an old woman, drest like a young girl
  • A well-rigged frigate ~ a well-dressed wench

1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue

“A button broke as we were fastening out collar – indeed, a button always does break when you are in a hurry and nobody to sew it on.”

~ Around the Tea Table by T. De Witt Talmage (1875) 

{Gail’s monthly read along for July is: Passion Blue by Victoria Strauss}

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

via antique-royals tumblr

Your Infusion of Cute . . .
Octopus Mosaics Snap! comparing ancient mosaics

Your Tisane of Smart . . .
Macarons: Everything Old is New, but Different, Again.

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  
A Tasting Menu of Female Representation

Book News:
Michael Senft of Zine on Prudence, “Fans of Jane Austen, P.G. Wodehouse and Connie Willis will love this irreverent adventure story…”

Quote of the Day:
“The suspicion started that she laced to tight.”
~ Around the Tea Table, by T. De Witt Talmage (1875)

Follow Gail on Facebook & Twitter. Or you can join her mailing list

Steampunk World’s Fair & Southwest Airlines Kobo

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

Before we get on to the doings at the fair, Gentle Reader, here’s some fun news…

Kobo is offering Southwest Airlines customers complimentary access of eBooks while in flight. It’s a pretty fun pilot program (pun intended) and I’m delighted to tell you that my YA publisher, Little Brown, has put forth Etiquette & Espionage. It will be available on board participating Southwest flights during the months of June and July.

For once, I’m not taking any Southwest flights during this time. But if any of you are, please let me know if you see it?

Now for a brief recap of the Steampunk World’s Fair!

Some Random Travel Thoughts

 

  • Flying is becoming more and more of problem, airlines seem to be getting worse, not better. I’m a frequent flyer and I fly on most major airlines. I will state, for the record, that they all pretty much suck, and they seem to be getting suckier. United held us over 2 hours on the runway at SFO because there was something wrong with the toilets. I’ll just leave you to contemplate that statement and why it makes sense to board us and then hold us on the tarmac without loos…
  • I did observe a class act, though. There was a French couple with the baby in the row opposite me. They managed their infant with remarkable aplomb for 8 confined hours. At one point, the child shook a in corked sport’s bottle and sprayed all the surrounding seats with water, particularly deluging the guy directly in front of her. Later I noticed that the Dad purchased the guy’s snack for him. Classy.
  • I may have decided on this trip that eggs are my favorite food.
  • Never trust a man in pleated pants.

The fair itself was lots of fun. A 5000 person event full of musicians and performers so that us author types were rather overwhelmed. The costumes were amazing, the weather unspeakable, and the people incredibly friendly.

I ran in to an extraordinary number of my characters around and about.

Self bracketed by Ivy and Alexia.

 

Lovely lady in a knitted dress with a knitted Spotted Custard

 

Bumbersnoot

 

Bumbersnoot in reticule disguise

 

Countess Nadasdy

 

Self and another Alexia

It is pretty awesome to see so much cosplay of my characters! It is one of my favorite things. There were also amazing tea parties, lovely end of run dinners with new friends, good conversation, and great music. All in all, I recommend this event, I wish I lived closer for then I would go every year.

{Gail’s monthly read along for May is The Outlaws of Sherwood by Robin McKinley}

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

More of Alexia and Ivy

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Tentacle in the hallway

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

Nibbles at tea: creackers with goat cheese, pear and blackberry

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  
Books of Art: 20 Medieval and Renaissance Women Reading

PROJECT ROUND UP 



The Books! 

 The Finishing School Series: 1 Etiquette & Espionage, 2 Curtsies & Conspiracies, 3
 The Custard Protocol Series: 1 Prudence, 2 Imprudence
The Parasol Protectorate Series: 1 Soulless, 2 Changeless, 3 Blameless, 4 Heartless, 5 Timeless
Parasol Protectorate Series manga graphic novels

Book News:
The Once & Future Podcast
Listen to our latest episode where I talk with the first lady of steampunk Gail Carriger about steampunk (duh!), steampunk in New Zealand, CHEESE, Douglas Adams, our strikingly similar approaches to writing, archeology, chaos theory…oh, and her amazing books!

Quote of the Day:

Like Gail on Facebook & Twitter. Or you can join her mailing list
She also has a fashion blog ~ Retro Rack.
The best place to talk all things Parasol Protectorate is on its
Facebook Group.

Gail Carriger Coop de Book Recommendation ~ The Hanged Man by P. N. Elrod (Miss Carriger Recommends)

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

So while I was on tour in March, I read an ARC of The Hanged Man by P. N. Elrod. It just came out yesterday and I really liked it, so I thought I would blather on about it at you.

It features Alex a physic (a little like being an empath) and various other entrants into the occult. I would call it more gaslight fantasy, as opposed to steampunk, in the vein of The Native Star by M. K. Hobson. I found the plot enjoyable to follow, the side characters very intriguing, and the love interest (or is it interests) appealing. For me, I would prefer a little more nookie and a little less gore, but you know how I roll.

 

The Hanged Man by P. N. Elrod

On a freezing Christmas Eve in 1879, a forensic psychic reader is summoned from her Baker Street lodgings to the scene of a questionable death. Alexandrina Victoria Pendlebury (named after her godmother, the current Queen of England) is adamant that the death in question is a magically compromised murder and not a suicide, as the police had assumed. After the shocking revelation contained by the body in question, Alex must put her personal loss aside to uncover the deeper issues at stake, before more bodies turn up.

Turning to some choice allies—the handsome, prescient Lieutenant Brooks, the brilliant, enigmatic Lord Desmond, and her rapscallion cousin James—Alex will have to marshal all of her magical and mental acumen to save Queen and Country from a shadowy threat. Our singular heroine is caught up in this rousing gaslamp adventure of cloaked assassins, meddlesome family, and dark magic.

{Gail’s monthly read along for May is The Outlaws of Sherwood by Robin McKinley}

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

1838 Ladies’ Cabinet Date-  Sunday, July 1, 1838 Item ID-  v. 20, plate 19

Your Infusion of Cute . . .
These aren’t your grandmother’s willow pattern plates

Your Tisane of Smart . . .
Time Travel Kitchen is cooking from my very favorite research book on food and domestic life in 1876! She talks all about what the food tastes like and everything. Brilliant!

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  
What You Should Know About Taxes When You’re a Freelancer

Book News:
Kitty Shields reviews Prudence, “Carriger has always been one for dialogue, and she manages to weave layers and barbs into the verbal fencing between Rue and just about anybody she comes up against. If you’re a fan of language and Victorian sensibilities, this is a book for you.”

Quote of the Day:
“Writing is a way of talking without being interrupted.”
~ Jules Renard

Like Gail on Facebook & Twitter. Or you can join her mailing list

Off to New Jersey for the Steampunk World’s Fair

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

My dear Gentle Reader, I am off to the Steampunk World’s Fair! I hope to see some of you there. I rarely get to the East Coast so this is your opportunity to catch me in person.

Before I get on to this weekend, I have a new teapot in my life. It pours well and brews a low grade leaf beautifully with no particulate. It produced 3 mugs of perfect tea and is my new pride and joy.

It’s the Forlife 24oz curve teapot with infuser for $30. It comes in white, blue, red, grey, lime, purple, orange, turquoise, black, green, yellow. And it is awesome!

Also I watched Boy Meets Girl. It is wonderful. My favorite movie this year.

And now…

Here is what I am up to at the Fair!

 

FRIDAY May 15, 2015

3:00 ~ 4:00pm Kaffeklatsch
Location disclosed at sign up

SATURDAY May 16, 2015

12:30 ~ 1:30pm Archaeology and Steampunk Panel
Radisson Salon C

2:00 ~ 3:00pm Gender in Steampunk Panel
Embassy Stage, Embassy

5:00 ~ 6:00pm Steampunk Lit panel
Radisson Salon C

SUNDAY May 17, 2015

12:30 ~ 2:30pm VIP Meet & Greet
Midway tent

3:30 ~ 4:30pm Signing/Autograph session
Embassy Centennial Room

I imagine the rest of the time I will be found where there is either A. Food or B. Alcohol. I am one of only a few authors there and I must represent! Rumor is the hotel has wireless, so I will be connected to the interwebs. (Although hotel wireless is always… hotel wireless.) As always, I’ll be all over the Twitters so if you want to meet up and can’t find me, I shouldn’t be hard to ping.

{Gail’s monthly read along for May is The Outlaws of Sherwood by Robin McKinley} 

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

Lost In Time by Will Davidson for Vogue Australia

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Pride and Prejudice Book Vintage Tote Bag $20

Your Tisane of Smart . . .
SCy-Fy interview with Pornokitsch

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  
The Evolution of a Book Cover

PROJECT ROUND UP 



The Books! 

 The Finishing School Series: 1 Etiquette & Espionage, 2 Curtsies & Conspiracies, 3
 The Custard Protocol Series: 1 Prudence, 2 Imprudence
The Parasol Protectorate Series: 1 Soulless, 2 Changeless, 3 Blameless, 4 Heartless, 5 Timeless
Parasol Protectorate Series manga graphic novels

Book News:

Waistcoats & Weaponry in Japan

Quote of the Day:
“Someday when alternate dimension technology has advanced into closet architecture we may finally know peace.”
~ @FergotIt on twitter

Like Gail on Facebook & Twitter. Or you can join her mailing list
She also has a fashion blog ~ Retro Rack.
The best place to talk all things Parasol Protectorate is on its
Facebook Group.

The Kiwi Files ~ Steampunk Cafe in Christchurch (Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

I’m delighted to announce that Waistcoats & Weaponry has won Steampunk Chronicle’s 2015 Reader’s Choice Award for Best Young Adult Steampunk Fiction! Thank you thank you!

And now for your regularly scheduled blog…

While in Christchurch, Gentle Reader, we stumbled upon a steampunk cafe. I had heard of its existence, but I didn’t know quite where to find it. But the AB and I spend quite some time walking around the downtown area and we stumbled upon it on one of our jaunts.

I was quite charmed by this young gentleman who chatted with us and showed us around the upper shop area.

One of the first things that caught my eye upon entering was this lamp meets dirigible. It might be fun to make some Chinese lanterns into balloons myself in that mystical land of future free time.

Found this little guy sitting atop a top hat.

And this was my favorite thing in the shop, a train meets drinks caddy. So fun!

During our rambles we also encountered a statue of Queen Victoria in one of the parks. I felt it very apt and tried to pay the proper homage.

I also fell in love with a pair of laser cut leather boots, but they were $600 and didn’t fit right, also the soles were really hard. These days I find myself (when hunting for more comfortable footwear) gravitating to men’s shoes. Not just because of the oxford style, but because they often have super comfortable squishy soles. Why don’t we women ever get those in walking boots? It’s not fair. And before you post a link to comfortable footwear I ALSO demand it be pretty, by my standards, thank you, and not look comfortable. And before you say, “Gail, just buy the men’s shoes,” I am sadly cursed with narrow, skinny feet (hence the lack of Fluvogs in my life).

And I don’t know how this post on Christchurch became one on shoes. But it’s me so I’m not surprised. The destruction wrought by the earthquakes was truly devastating, and although the spirit of the city is still there and they are fighting to come back, it did feel awfully sad.

{Gail’s monthly read along for May is The Outlaws of Sherwood by Robin McKinley}

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

one fine day, Akihabara   via ninetail-fox tumblr

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

NZ is also the land of rainbows, so much changeable weather

Your Tisane of Smart . . .
The fine art of walking city streets in the 19th century (via Two Nerdy History)

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  
In Defense of Editing

Book News:
Jess of Shelf Quest says of Prudence:

“For those familiar with the preceding series, I have no doubt that this story will enthrall and excite. We see the return of many of our most beloved characters and the way some of them have grown (up) and changed is just really lovely.”

Quote of the Day:

“More people should do things on their own, most of humanity’s problems have been caused by people meeting and talking.”

~ Andy Zaltzman

Like Gail on Facebook & Twitter. Or you can join her mailing list

Gail Carriger’s Kiwi Files ~ Rotorua & A New Zealand SciFi Convention

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

My entire trip to New Zealand, Gentle Reader, was because of one man: Andrew. Andrew and I met at the WorldCon in Melbourne a few years ago. Apparently, he was talking to Pip and Tee and saw me in my checked outfit. He asked who I was and they told him, and then he asked to be introduced.

Andrew’s first Gail sighting, image courtesy of him.

Apparently during the course of that meeting, he conceived of the idea of having a steampunk themed convention in Rotorua (steam central) with me, Pip, and Tee. Three years later there I was, flying to New Zealand. Moral of this story? Style will get you anywhere.

Gail Author interview with Andrew photo by Martyn

I’ve been to New Zealand before and loved it. I had even been to Rotorua. But the AB never has traveled Down Under at all, and neither of us have ever visited the South Island. So the plan was to do the convention first, then fly to Christchurch, where we would pick up a camper van and drive around the South Island for a week and a half, then fly back to Auckland, meet my publishers and explore the city before heading home. Things pretty much went according to plan. Also, because of some tips from people at the con, we added the Steampunk HQ in Oamaru to our list, well worth a visit.

Rotorua is quite beautiful, if a little smelly, and the convention was an intimate gathering of super fans many of whom had traveled quite some distance to be there. In addition to the convention, there was also a steampunk gathering at a beautiful Victorian tea house.

Steampunk Rotorura by Martyn

For some reason, I was feeling the cider on this trip. I really liked a lot of the local ones I tried, they were sweet, but not too sweet. There were some new flavors of Crabbies to try too (which were quite sweet indeed, but I loved them anyway.)

More on food and drink to come. Pip pip!

{Gail’s monthly read along for April is The Eyre Affaire by Jasper Fforde}

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

La Belle Assemblee Wednesday, August 1, 1838 Item ID-  v. 20, plate 22

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Fox Glacier and Lake

Your Tisane of Smart . . .
14 Insane Names Victorian Parents Actually Gave Their Kids

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  
Repetition, Redundancy, and Overused Punctuation—Oh My!

Book News:

 

German hard covers for the Parasol Protectorate Books.

Quote of the Day:
“Gamine.” That’s another one of Bea’s words. It means waiflike, only more so and in French. Which I reckon makes it double.
~ Karen Memory by Elizabeth Bear

Like Gail on Facebook & Twitter. Or you can join her mailing list

Gail Carriger’s Kiwi Files ~ Steampunk HQ in Oamaru, New Zealand (Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

So, Gentle Reader, after a fun convention in Rotorura (more to come on that) the AB and I hopped a plane for the South Island, rented a camper van (yes, I camped) and drove around the South Island. Once we left Christchurch (more to come on that too) one of the first places we visited was Oamaru and their wonderful Steampunk HQ.

Steampunk HQ

I don’t know how they managed it, but someone got permission to turn this derelict old building into a massive steampunk installation piece. There are two floors inside, including the fab portal room, and a bunch of large rusted machines outside. It mixes sculptural elements with human interface operations, e.g. a pipe organ that makes steam sounds instead of music). Frankly trying to describe Steampunk HQ is like trying to describe steampunk itself, a mite challenging.

Steampunk HQ plaque

The portal, was my favorite. It’s a room made of mirrors so that once you step inside and close the door it feels like you are standing in infinity. There is an LED light show as you stand suspended in space, the whole universe around you. It drove me to near Douglas Adams-like verboseness. Also very vertigo educing, if you are prone to that sort of thing. Not me, whatever the opposite of vertigo is, I have that, I adore being very high up.

Random street.

The rest of Oamaru was charming too. We walked around and ate lunch at a pub, because it seemed like the kind of place where one ought to lunch at a pub. We then visited a charming cafe and did all the tourist rambling one is supposed to. We even managed to see wild penguins.

Hotel & cafe

More on NZ to come, sorry to be delayed in posting I’m finding myself a little overwhelmed with catch up right now. What with the Tucson festival, book tour, and this trip I’ve been (essentially) away from my desk for six weeks! I’ve managed to maintain while on the go but I put a lot of stuff aside to “deal with when I get back” and now I’m back M&M proofs are immanent. Things never stop, do they?

{Gail’s monthly read along for April is The Eyre Affaire by Jasper Fforde}

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

The Daily Victorian tumblr

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Pride and Prejudice Ch 54a Tote Bag

Your Tisane of Smart . . .
Corset expert discusses Cinderella waist controversy and, of course, corsets

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  
8 Reasons Why Authors Are Assholes

Book News:

80sidol-tumblr fan art of Tunstell Ivy

Quote of the Day:

Prudence Lord A Quote
Like Gail on Facebook & Twitter. Or you can join her mailing list

Steampunk Accessories DIY & More from Gail Carriger (Miss Carriger Recommends)

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

They say the devil is in the details, but I say the steampunk is in the details. It’s the little touches to any costume (or any cosplay for that matter) that strike a cord with others. I don’t know about you, but I dress up so that I can meet and mingle with fellow enthusiasts. I want people to ask me why I have teaspoons attached to the neckline of my favorite corset. (My answer: Who doesn’t want spoons on their boobs?)

The best steampunk outfits that I’ve seen employ tiny details and nifty tricks to bring out the personality of the wearer or the character they are portraying. Since I am an author who is awfully fond of tea, most of the details in my outfits hint at writing or the sacred beverage. However, I also nod in the direction of my books and my former profession. That’s part of the fun or steampunk, hinting at persona with apparel.

Here are a few of my very favorite and most useful steampunk accessories…

1. Holster

My parasol holster is made from an old pair of cargo shorts. You can adapt the idea for any oddball accessory you may have from a Nerf modded steampunk gunto a wine bottle or a burrito (I support the idea of packing food at all times).

2. Goggles

Yes goggles and steampunk get a bad rap, but I still love them. I go so far as to mock the persuasiveness of this accessory in my books. (In my final Finishing School book the young ladies of quality wear floating goggles while cutting onions.) However, it doesn’t stop me from being the proud owner of my very own pair. But here’s the thing, they have that little twist that make them me-ish – they have tea trainers for lenses. So useful! They were made by BruteForce Studios, but it’s pretty fun to make your own using found objects that have meaning to you.

3. Fan

Speaking of Brute Force Studios, I love their leather fan. Perhaps not the most practical accessory but one thing I have learned a conventions is, temperatures vary widely. If a girl can arrange her costume to be cool in some rooms and warm in others, it’s never a bad thing. This a fan is always welcome. I love it so much I mailed it to my publisher in the hopes that it might be part of the cover of my latest book. And they used it! They added blades, because my character is a spy meets assassin and thus blades must be part of the equation. However, I’m glad mine is just leather, otherwise I’d never git it through TSA.

4. Pocket Belt

In the grand scheme of useful accessories, this is my most useful. You can buy some beautiful pocket belts around the interwebs, or you can make your ownfrom an old pair of cargo pants (I know more cargo pants, but they really are very good starters for steampunking).

5. Bolt Snaps

Perhaps not so notable in and of themselves but the best solution I have found for clipping all my favorite accessories to my belt or corset are these bronze double ended bolt snaps. You can get these handy little guys in various sizes, styles, and finishes online, from a local hardware store, or from a marine supply shop. I happen to find this particular design the most useful.

6. Magnification Lens

I can’t remember where I picked up this little field lens, but I think it’s adorable. It’s just a bit of a magnifier, and it telescopes closed. I have used it to take a closer look at items in a dealer’s room, but it’s mostly just for show. I really love it because it reminds my of my former life as an archaeologist.

7. Tiny Hat

Because I am so often flying to steampunk events having small hats is key. It is rather difficult to travel with overly large head embellishments in this day and age. Yes, I am aware this particular hat is quite ridiculous. But, hey, it can also be used as a duster! I made it using an old shoulder padand a large feather cluster rescued from some ignominious thrift store fate. The shoulder pad technique is popular in the retro community and I simply repurposed it for steampunk. All your DIYs belong to us!

8. Watch

OK, I admit, I bought this necklace watch just because I thought it was so pretty. These days you can find tons of options in many online stores. I like the necklace option because I can wear it as such or hook it onto the belt and stick it in a pocket instead. I find that at events I always need to know what time it is, and this works a treat.

9. Utensils

Food, my one true passion. I admit to having a bit of an obsession with the lowly spoon. I’m particularly fond of the ones that look like perfect little round bowls stuck on the ends of sticks. I have no logical explanation for this. Anyway, for nearby conventions I have this utensil kit I strap to my belt acquired many years ago at a local Renaissance Faire. (What? You’re surprise?) But for away conventions when the knife would prove a challenge to transport I just pack the little teaspoon on a chain and clip. At first it was just for fun, but you would not believe how useful I’ve found it. I’m contemplating just wearing a spoon on my person at all times. But a girl can get a reputation like that. Not sure what kind of a reputation, but still…

10. Pouch

When I’m not wearing a pocket belt, I need something to carry stuff in (phone, cards, money, tiny squids and other snacks, as you do). I picked up this fab little pouch from Oberon Design at a faire years ago. (What? OK, OK, I worked there.) I added a few steampunk embellishments and an extra D ring or two and with one of those bolt snaps I can clip it to most parts of me.

Wearing All the Things with the lovely John at a local Steampunk event.

{What is Gail’s Book Group reading for January? Kat, Incorrigible by Stephanie Burgis}

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

1866-1868  The Philadelphia Museum of Art

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

 

 Robe à Transformation  Depret, 1867  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

Your Tisane of Smart . . .
Superstitious Eggs

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  
Charles I’s travelling library

Book News:
Chelsey on GoodReads says of Gail’s writing in Waistcoats & Weaponry that, “She has a rare talent in providing her readers with vivid details and new twists but without confusing us with too many new plot lines.”

Quote of the Day:

Follow Gail on Facebook & Twitter. Or you can join her mailing list

Upon the 6th Birthday of Soulless

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

First, some lovely news, Gentle Reader.

 Etiquette & Espionage is on sale today for $2.99 through Apple, as part of their “50 Great Books, 50 Great Series” in the US & Canada.

And now, on to your regularly scheduled blog post…

October 1, 2009 a silly little book hit the market.

A very nervous debut author hummed and hawed over her offering. Would anyone actually like it? It was such an odd mash up of paranormal, steampunk, and comedy – who would enjoy such a ridiculous story? Were there readers out there irreverent enough to enjoy whimsy?

SoullessFINAL

Well, Soulless turns five years old today. The silly little book that I thought would find a home in only a very few people’s hearts seems to have miraculously wormed its way out into the world and touched many.

FrenchSoullessPaperback copy JapeneseSoullessCover

Soulless has now sold into 14 different territories for translation. There’s been a graphic novel manga version (which itself is now translated into French and German) and an omnibus. It’s been optioned for TV. It’s spawned a dress up doll, various videos, fan art, several tea parties, audio books, cosplay, and an iPhone app. There is even a fan site!

SoullessAUDIO SoullessFinalCover copy

Little did I know how much that one book would so utterly change my life.

In these last five years:

  • After getting my second masters degree I put my PhD on indefinite hiatus.
  • I gave up teaching archeology, discontinued my experimental work, and stopped my field visits.
  • Basically, I switched careers.
  • I relocated twice.
  • I visited 9 foreign countries promoting the books, 5 of which I’ve never traveled to before.
  • I made countless new friends and been blessed with a chance to visit old ones.
  • I watched the steampunk movement grow and expand.
  • I went to conventions and signings all over the world and learned valuable lessons from fellow authors.
  • I ate hundreds of foods, dishes, and sweets I’d never tried before.
  • I wrote 10 additional books: 4 followups to Soulless, 1 YA sci-fi, and 4 YA Finishing School books, 1 Custard Protocol book.
  • And, best of all, I got to meet my readers: some here on the blog, some on twitter, some on Facebook, some in person ~ all of you so warm and fun and strong and smart.

 

OctopusSpineProof

There have been good reviews and glorious ones, nasty gripes and soundly presented critiques. I’ve tackled tough times in social media, and made more than my share of online mistakes. But in the end, it always came back to Soulless and the writing. Did the book make you smile? Then I did my job.

So, thank you so very much, Gentle Reader, and if you have the time or inclination please raise up a teacup in honor of Soulless, who’s original secret code name, at the dawn of this blog, was “The Little Paranormal That Could.” I guess Soulless could and did.

And if you put a spot of amaretto in your tea, well, I won’t tell.

Thanks for five glorious years!

SoullessOriginalImageSoullessThatWasn't

 

Soulless’s original cover art photograph and the cover that never was.

Many of you have been with me all along, and several of you have already posted to similar October 1 posts of the past, for which I thank you. But if you would like to share your “How I discovered Soulless” story in the comments bellow, I would love to read them. I’m in edit hell right now so I might not have tiem to respond to each individually but i promise that I do read them all.

{What is Gail’s Book Group reading for October? Grave Mercy by Robin LaFevers}

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

1900 Th Jersey Lilly with a Parasol

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

I ADORE this image if you know the photographer please tell me?

Your Tisane of Smart . . .
Teaching Moment: Make A Banned Books Bookshelf

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

Book News:
Tea and Jeopardy – 27 – Gail Carriger visits the tea lair
“In this episode, the utterly splendid author Gail Carriger is invited into the secret tea lair. We talk about etiquette, the many ways in which octopi are remarkable, archaeology and some of the strange things Gail has eaten.

Quote of the Day:
“We plan, we toil, we suffer – in the hope of what?  A camel-load of idol’s eyes?  The title deeds of Radio City?  The empire of Asia?  A trip to the moon?  No, no, no, no.  Simply to wake just in time to smell coffee and bacon and eggs.”
~ J.B. Priestly

 

Follow Gail on Facebook & Twitter. Or you can join her mailing list

Gail Carriger’s Steampunk Book Suggestions (Miss Carriger Recommends)

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

Hello my dear Gentle Reader! I’m back. OK so you didn’t even notice I was gone.

But I did pay a short visit to a local convention, Convolution, this last Saturday. It was pretty low key with an excellent greenroom and good company. I didn’t stay for the parties. I did get to meet GOH Tanya Huff. She is marvelous. It was my third time meeting her. (She doesn’t remember me ~ see it happens to me too!) Anyway, managed to ascertain that there would be no follow up to The Silvered. I may pick that for a read along next year, although it is quite violent.

Now, here for your amusement is a glimpse into my brain: some book recs from my first panel.

Steaming Outside Victorian London

Alt. history same time period: Scott Westerfeld, Cherie Priest, The Native StarM.K. Hobson, Pillars of Hercules by David Constantine, Ministry Of Peculiar Occurrences ref New Zealand, non-books League of S.T.E.A.M., possibly Murdoch Mysteries(?). Also got onto the subject of the Antikythera devise (featured in in Curious Case).

History shift location: A Nomad of the Time Streams by Michael Moorcock has some in China, The Anubis Gates has Egypt, non-fiction Daughters of the Empire, movie Castle in the Sky and TV series Last Exile. I want to know: What if the Inka has steam technology? Others on the panel wanted to bring on the seapunk.

Off world:
Clockwork Heart, Tobias Buckell, some Terry Pratchett, non-books Space 1889 RPG and Galaxy 999 out of Japan.

We also got into a heated discussion about whether people are less gullible now than 100 years ago. I promised that I would email More or Less for a statistical answer. I have done so and I will keep an ear to the podcast and let you know if they decide to answer me.

Want more behind the scenes sneak peeks? Join the Chirrup

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

edwardian-time-machine tublr: Parasol with amethyst pug knob, 1900–1910

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

Oooo, fancy drawers cutting board compost thing. I love it!

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

Lilliput sits on my story bibles

Quote of the Day:
“When he talked the conversation was all on his side.”
~ Around the Tea Table by T. De Witt Talmage (1875)


In Which Gail is a Cover Model

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

Lookie, Gentle Reader! Dan put me on the cover of his steampunk anthology, Frock Coat Dreams.

This picture was taken in Orycon in 2010, just before Dan and I went up to Steamcon (after which we got caught in a blizzard, had an epic car crash and miraculous journey home). Anyway, this anthology includes one of my favorite steampunk short stories of all time: “Cold Duty” and I am honored to be on the cover.

In other news, over on Retro Rack I natter on about the dresses featured in Curtsies & Conspiracies. I’ll be doing a number of posts on the fashion of the 1850s as relates to Sophronia and her friends over the next few months, mainly because with two books in the series releasing (the paperback of Curtsies on October 7, and the hardback of Waistcoats & Weaponry on November 4) these are the fashion styles that I have been thinking about a great deal.

{What is Gail’s Book Group reading for September? Children of the Night by Mercedes Lackey}

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

1900 Dancing Parasol via FB

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Your Tisane of Smart . . .
“In all cases, when a gift is sent to you, return a note of thanks; or at least a verbal message to that effect.”
~ The Ladies’ Guide to True Politeness and Perfect Manners or, Miss Leslie’s Behaviour Book
by Eliza Leslie (1864)

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  
Book signings from hell.  (Oh yes, I have had some. Ask me about “the one with George & Paul” sometime over a drink and I will tell you all.)

PROJECT ROUND UP 
Prudence ~ Custard Protocol Book the First:   Releases March 17, 2015 now available for pre-order! Waiting on proofs.
Manners & Mutiny ~ The Finishing School Book the Last.   Rewriting now. Release date November 2015. Not yet available for pre-order.


The Books! 

 The Finishing School Series: 1 Etiquette & Espionage, 2 Curtsies & Conspiracies, 3
Waistcoats & Weaponry (Coming November 4, 2014)
 The Custard Protocol Series: 1 Prudence (Coming March 17, 2015)
The Parasol Protectorate Series: 1 Soulless, 2 Changeless, 3 Blameless, 4 Heartless, 5 Timeless
Parasol Protectorate Series manga graphic novels

Book News:
Libby Blog Posted by Marmaladelibby (aka Ange) about C&C: “These books are SO DARN FUN!!! I just really like these characters. Each and every one that Gail has created is so well developed and interesting. …The plot in this book really opens up and thickens up. WOW! I cannot imagine how Gail Carriger keeps track of all of the twists and turns she has created in her plot. This was just mad fun. I enjoyed it so much and could not guess it ahead of time completely which is what I always hope for… If you have not tried these yet you really need to.”
(How did I keep track? Ah yes, this is the book for which I had the brain!)

Quote of the Day:
“Hell, it is well known, has no fury like a woman who wants her tea and can’t get it.”
~ P.G. Wodehouse, Very Good, Jeeves!

 

Follow Gail on Facebook & Twitter. Or you can join her mailing list
She also has a fashion blog ~ Retro Rack.
The best place to talk all things Parasol Protectorate is on its
Facebook Group.

© 2021 Gail Carriger | Disclaimer & Privacy Policy | Site built by Todd Jackson