Tagged BLAMELESS

Channing Channing of the Chesterfield Channings is a Cad (in 4 Quotes) (Behind the Magic)

Posted by Gail Carriger

Gentle Reader,

A bit of a look back on Major Channing, today, before his new book comes out.

Here’s a collection of some of my favorite Channing quotes from his appearances as a side character in other Parasolverse books!

“Who the devil are you?” Alexia asked, the man’s cavalier interference irritating her into using actual profanity.
“Major Channing Channing of the Chesterfield Channings.”
Alexia gawked. No wonder he was so very full of himself. One would have to be, laboring all one’s life under a name like that.

~ Changeless

“Really, Channing,” remonstrated Alexia, “did you have to eat the man’s dog? I am convinced you will experience terrible indigestion.”

~ Blameless

“As to your sister, she is quite a peach, is she not? You have been hiding her from me.”
Lady Maccon would not be goaded. “Really, Channing, she is practically”―she paused to do some calculations―“one-twentieth your age. Or worse. Don’t you want some maturity in your life?”
“Good God, no!”
“Well, how about some human decency?”
“Now you’re just being insulting.”
Alexia huffed in amusement.

~ Heartless

“Channing was incredibly easy on the eyes. Lanky but muscled, with crystal-clear blue eyes and pale blond hair. He was like some winter god, Jack Frost perhaps.
If only he didn’t also shoot first in the firing squad of premier pompous twats.”

~ Romancing the Werewolf

OUT MAY 13, 2018!

Amazon | Kobo | B&N | iBooks | Direct from Gail

How to Marry a Werewolf (In 10 Easy Steps) ~ A Claw & Courtship Novella by Gail Carriger is now awabile (print, audio & other editions will follow). Featuring a certain white wolf we all love to hate (except those of us weirdos who love to love him). Add this book on Goodreads.

Guilty of an indiscretion? Time to marry a werewolf.

Rejected by her family, Faith crosses the Atlantic, looking for a marriage of convenience and revenge. But things are done differently in London. Werewolves are civilized. At least they pretend to be.

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

Frederick Frieseke (American artist, 1874-1939) Woman Seated in a Garden

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Lilliput, AKA Superior General Bean

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

Swedish Academy DRAMA!

Book News:

The Tome Gnome says of Soulless:

“This was my first foray into the world of steampunk, and I’m completely in love. I didn’t think I liked historical-ish books, so I passed over Soulless so many times. Perhaps I don’t like straight up historicals, but I sure do love them with vampires, werewolves, and all sorts of steampunk inventions.”

Quote of the Day:

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? There’s a wiki for that!


Japanese Covers of the Parasol Protectorate Books ~ So Cute! (Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

Dearest Gentle Reader,

Here’s  special extra peek at the covers for the Japanese translation (not the manga) of the Parasol Protectorate series. They are so cute and little and charming. Some may even still be available (signed to buy) over in Tinker’s Pack.

Speaking of the Japanese covers…

It’s always fun to see an artist’s take on a scene from one of my books.

Soulless

Changeless

Blameless

Heartless

Timeless

Some Fun Related Links

LATEST RELEASE

Amazon | Kobo | B&N | iBooks | Direct

Romancing the Werewolf ~ A Supernatural Society Novella by Gail Carriger is now available (audio will follow).

Gay reunion romance featuring your favorite reluctant werewolf dandy, the return of a certain quietly efficient Beta, and some unexpected holiday gifts.

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

Allen & Ginter (American, Richmond, Virginia)
Here, from the Parasol Drills series (N18) for Allen & Ginter Cigarettes Brands, 1888

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

The 7 Differences Between Professionals and Amateurs

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

On Parentheses:

“Never use hard words unnecessarily; nor particular words or phrases too often; use as few parentheses as possible; it is a clumsy way of disposing of a sentence, and often embarrasses the reader.”

~ The Lady’s Guide to Perfect Gentility by Emily Thornwell, 1856

Book News:

self getting all meta and cosplaying her own book cover

Quote of the Day:

“A good cook is not made, he is born; so if you are lucky enough to find one, do anything to keep him – short of letting him know that you are anxious to do so.”

~ Steel & Gardiner, 1888

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? There’s a wiki for that!


8 Deleted Scenes from the Parasol Protectorate by Gail Carriger (Soulless, Changeless, Blameless Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

Please be aware that deleted scenes may and often do contain spoilers. Read at your own risk.

DELETED BITS from Soulless

The Hypocras Club Objectives

  • Attentiveness — Identify and understand the supernatural threat, assess vulnerabilities, determine potential impacts and disseminate information to our members and security partners.
  • Preclusion — Detect, deter and mitigate the supernatural threat to the commonwealth.
  • Precaution — Safeguard normal humans and their freedoms, and maintain critical infrastructure and intellectual advancement of the scientific community.

Alexia’s Father’s Journal

Ivy had always been faintly cheered by the fact that should a marriage bed ever be in her future, she could go to Alexia for an explanation of what might occur there. Sadly for Miss Hisselpenny, such an explanation was likely to contain concepts that would shock the most experienced whore down dockside, let alone a gently bred lady. Mr. Tarabotti had had very exotic interests indeed, and Alexia hadn’t the experience to provide any kind of filter.

DELETED BITS from Changeless

Description of Woolsey Castle

The most scandalous thing about Woolsey Castle was not that it housed a pack of werewolves. After all, only the best counties could boast such an eccentricity. Nor was it the fact that it boasted eight flying buttresses – an architecturally immodest choice. No, the most scandalous thing about Woolsey Castle was that there was a bedroom, and sometimes several, on every single storey, even the first. The original owner was a bit of an eccentric, in the “if he had not had money he would have been called insane” kind of way. Woolsey was no castle, not really. It was instead a modern manor house made to look like a castle with stone facings, an excessive number of haphazardly applied turrets, crenelated battlements, extensive dungeons, and the aforementioned buttresses.

Scene with Lyall, Channing, & Biffy (just after breaking and entering)

Channing crossed his arms. “I would have been just as effective.”
“Yes, but Biffy was a safer choice.”
Biffy looked mildly offended.
“If he was caught it would be thought an inter-vampire plot, if you were caught it would be considered an inter-species plot.”
Biffy looked less offended and nodded his agreement with Lyall’s assessment.
Channing was militant. “I do not trust him!”
“Biffy?” Lyall wondered mildly.
Biffy looked pleased at the accusation.
Channing was annoyed with Lyall’s obtuseness. “No, no, Lord Akeldama.”
Lyall puffed air out his nostrils in annoyance. “You do not trust vampires.”
“You saying you do trust them?”
Professor Lyall looked out the carriage window.
Channing had never learned the art of silence. “I am Gamma. It is my nature to question.”
“You are you. It is your nature to be a prat.”
Biffy gave a tiny gasp at such werewolf directness. It was most unsettling to a vampire drone.
Channing smiled. “Admit it, you sense it too. We are missing something.” He looked at the drone. “Why does your master like our fiery lady Alpha so much?”
Biffy shrugged. “They are friends.”
Channing ignored this reply and turned back to Professor Lyall. “You and I have dabbled in London politics long enough to know: Lord Akeldama doesn’t have friends.”
Professor Lyall gave his Gamma a level look. “You like her, admit it.”
Biffy muttered, “Major Channing seems to like nothing but Major Channing.”
Major Channing ignored this. “She’s plucky. I like plucky. She’s not, however, to Lord Akeldama’s taste. What does he really want with her?”
“Give it a rest, would you please Channing?”
“You know something!”
Lyall glared at him. “Yes. I know the right question to ask. You are not asking it.”
“Oh?”
“What have we learned on this little adventure of ours?”
Channing blinked icy blue eyes at his Beta blankly.
It was Biffy who answered. “That my master is not the only vampire to find Lady Maccon intriguing.”
“Exactly.” With which Professor Lyall turned once more to stare out the carriage window, apparently fascinated by the way the gas lighting flickered over the cobbled street.

DELETED BITS from Blameless

Blog entry all about the Knights Templar and the notes that built them into the men they are in Blameless.

In Which Alexia Compares Marriage to Kidnapping

Due, she suspected, entirely to the interference of Lord Conall Maccon, Earl of Woolsey, circumstances had arranged for Alexia to experience a series of kidnappings that culminated in a rather more long term version of the uncomfortable experience, if marriage can be referred to as such. Which, she felt, marriage to Lord Maccon, could be. Or was she, perhaps, besmirching the reputation of imprisonments everywhere through such a comparison?

Regardless, it appeared she was currently embroiled in yet another state of abduction. Although, it must be admitted, she wasn’t entirely certain that being confined to ones well-appointed room, with a delicious view of Italy’s premier artistic city could be, rightly, referred to as being kidnapped. It certainly was, so far, working out better than her marriage, but she did feel ever-so-slightly imprisoned. Since the Templars seemed to have discovered her weakness, and had been plying her with gnocchi and pesto for the entire day, she was, for the moment, disinclined to complain about the situation. She was even allowed regular trips to the library. She was not allowed into the city anymore, but this seemed a small price to pay for unending pesto and library privileges. However, as they appeared to believe they could keep her in such a state for the next seven months or so, she was figuring that at some point her love of the little green covered dumplings might deteriorate enough for her to contemplate escape. As it was, she was happy to chew and stare out into the orange glory of the Italian landscape with a head full of mild speculation and a hope for Floote and Genevieve’s safety.

Her peace was only broken by occasional visits from Mr. Lange-Wilsdorf, who insisted on running a series of intrusive and occasionally embarrassing tests, after which he would vanish once more, muttering to himself in his own language. No Templar, including the preceptor, intruded upon her peace and quiet, and if Alexia missed the bumbling clattering noises of Woolsey castle and its hairy inhabitants she did not admit it, even to herself. After the excitement of her European Tour so far, she was happy for the break, at least she was not running from anything, whacking at anyone, or passing out. Life, it might even be said, was looking up.

In Which the Origin’s of Ivy’s Letter Is Discussed

Floote having – though some miraculous feet of butler-dum – hired a pony and trap to take their luggage back through the town, turned up at Alexia’s elbow. “If you are through here, madam?”
His tone, Alexia noticed, was unwarranted in its sharpness. “Something troubling you, Floote?”
“That letter is dangerous, madam.”
Alexia looked with shock at the innocent apple-blossom scented communiqué. “Is it really? Who would have thought?” Hurriedly she tucked it up one sleeve and followed her personal secretary towards the hired cart.
Floote explained. “Not in what in contains, madam, but in what it represents. If the honorable Mrs. Tunstell has managed to track us down here, then the vampires certainly cannot be far behind.”
Alexia considered the obsession. “Indeed. You raise very good question, Floote, how did Ivy manage such a thing?” She examined the outside of the letter. “It looks as though it came through to Monsieur Trouvé via your university contacts, Madame Lefoux. Your ghostly Aunt must have known where to send it and directed Ivy accordingly. I can’t imagine Ivy consulting with a ghost, but there you have it.”
“Oh dear,” Madame Lefoux looked apprehensive. “I did not mean to put any of my friends or scientific acquaintances in danger.”
Alexia nodded her agreement. “Nor I. After all, the vampires are after me. I do hope your associates remain unmolested. What about Monsieur Trouvé?”
Madame Lefoux sidled up to Alexia and nodded downwards. The Frenchwoman opened her tightly closed fist and flashed Alexia a peek of some small object she held clutched in her hand. It was a tiny brass octopus.
“Oh!” Alexia’s voice was soft. “Is that what was left sitting atop your hatbox! Is it a sign?”
Madame Lefoux began to explain in hushed tones, “Well, you see back when –”
Floote interrupted, sharply. “I think perhaps we ought to think on our own safety, for the moment, ladies.”

Bird’s nest hat by Chicago milliner Bes Ben, c. 1941 via @FashionHistoryM Twitter

On the Danger of a Fly to One’s Reputation

Those few cabs that were available were all hansoms. While Alexia admitted a two-seat fly was speedy and agile, she couldn’t get over her feeling that it was a rather racy mode of transport for a mature lady. She preferred a proper coach. But she had to cast her scruples aside for Madame Lefoux and Floote swung themselves in with alacrity into the first fly that stopped and Alexia had no choice but to follow.

In Which Floote Talks (too much) About Alessandro Tarabotti

Floote cleared his throat delicately. “Perhaps we should return to our quarters, ladies. We are perilously close to being observed in familial proximity.”
Floote drew Alexia aside once they reached their apartments on a lower deck. Madame Lefoux having gone, so she said, to ‘handle the mustache.’
“He did come to see you once, madam. He watched you crawl about, from across Hyde Park, using a spyglass. You were still in nappies.”
“A spyglass? How reassuring.”
Floote gave a funny little half shoulder twitch that Alexia suspected was his version of a shrug. “If you knew Mr. Tarabotti, you would realize, that was practically a declaration of undying affection.”
“Not very demonstrative, my dad?”
“About as affectionate as a poisonous jellyfish, and just as easy to keep hold of.”
Alexia wrinkled her nose, “Yeach.”
“Just so, madam.”
Floote turned to leave.
“But Floote, I thought you liked my father.”
Floote’s perennially stiff back, stiffened ever so slightly more.
“Good evening, madam,” he said, in his no nonsense voice.
Alexia knew that tone well enough; she would get no more out of him tonight. “Good evening, Floote.”

Praise for the Parasol Protectorate Series

 

  • Fangirlish says of the Parasol Protectorate series: “You’ve got the steampunk, 007 spy angle with some supernatural shenanigans… and viola… it is one of the best book series ever!”
  • Magic of Books Book Video Blog says: “I don’t think I’ve read any book quite like this series. There’s just something really unique and refreshing about Gail Carriger’s writing. It’s incredibly humorous. It’s incredibly witty and I think, most important of all, it’s cleverly intelligent.”
  • BloomTV Video Blog says: “The writing is witty and hilarious and funny. That’s partly why I love Gail Carriger so much. She writes these amazing, unique characters who have witty banter with each other.”
  • Lindsey Rey does an Author Exploration on Gail Carriger: “What I love so much about Gail Carriger’s works are her characters. Her characters are always fully three-dimensional, they’re interesting, they’re funny, they make you laugh. The way Gail Carriger writes them you just fall in love with the entire cast.”
  • Emma Newman of Split Worlds series:: “Of course, it’s more than just the alternative history and world-building that made me fall in love with the series; the characters are great fun and the pacing is fantastic. It’s a gorgeous, sumptuous world that is fun and comforting to sink into, so if you haven’t tried it yet (and honestly, where have you been?) then please do.” (Emma is also the genius behind the Tea & Jeopardy podcast, and one of my favorite voice actresses.
  • Joy’s Book Blog says: “I don’t think you need to be a fantasy or steampunk fan to enjoy this series. It’s all about the humor.”
  • Lilyreadbooks says: “The perfect blend of Steampunk science, supernatural creatures, and Victorian comedy.”

Gail Carriger Blameless Themed Goodie Box is Coming!

Posted by Gail Carriger

The Chirrup, is soon to go out, Gentle Reader!

This time I’m giving away a Blameless themed goodie box to members, full of lovely things, which one lucky Chirrup member will win. There is also a stack of books to the runner up.

Why Blameless? Because Romancing the Werewolf is coming and there’s some setup for that book in Blameless.

Here’s what’s in the goodie box…

  • book on teacups
  • the out of print mass market first edition of Blameless, signed
  • Red scarf & matched feather change purse,
  • assorted bookmarks & other swag
  • tea sample
  • mock victorian earrings
  • ladybug pin & octopus necklace

  

 

The stack of books includes…

You know what you need to do…

Meanwhile, my tea is getting cold… scandal!

Miss Gail

{Coop de Book: Gail’s monthly read along for September is The Forgotten Beasts of Eld by Patricia McKillip.}

COMING NOV 5th!

Amazon | Kobo | B&N | iBooks

Romancing the Werewolf ~ A Supernatural Society Novella by Gail Carriger will be available in digital form on Nov 5th (print & audio to follow).

Gay reunion romance featuring your favorite reluctant werewolf dandy, the return of a certain quietly efficient Beta, and some unexpected holiday gifts.

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

1903 Ring Class at the Richmond Cat Show from The Book of the Cat by Frances Simpson

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

On Display at the Ripped Bodice

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

Over 100 Years Later, Photographer Alice Austen Is Finally Being Recognized as an LGBTQ Icon

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

Writing Away From Home, c. 1780

Book News:

ace-artemis-fanartist Alexia Support

Quote of the Day:

 “Blair Eggleston was a man who wore side-whiskers and if the truth were known, was probably a secret beret-wearer as well.”

~ P.G. Wodehouse

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? There’s a wiki for that!


The Range of Cover Art – Gail Carriger’s Blameless (Behind the Magic of the Parasol Protectorate)

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

Good morning, Gentle Reader!

Today I thought it might be fun for you to see the range of cover art that my book Blameless got over the course of time and space and 7 years in publication.

Here we go…

 

First off is the original mass market paperback as produced September 19, 2010. Next to it I have the Brazilian version so you can see how a foreign publisher might tweak the cover for their market.

 

Here on left is the Japanese translation version, this is the smallest of my books. It’s about the size of a 3X5 card. Next to it is the manga adaptation of Blameless, called Soulless Vol. 3.

 

Here are the two German versions. The first was a limited run collectible hardcover, the second is the original paperback translation.

Aside from Germany (and the pocket edition in France) and Japan, every other foreign publisher chose to do a take on the original cover image for their translations. This is pretty unusual and rather flattering.

The first three audiobooks were produced by Recorded Books (not Hachette Audio) so they got different covers too.

There it is. What do you think of the different covers? Anything surprise you? Any one you really love?

 Praise for Blameless

  • Cassandra Giovanni says: “Carriger once again has woven a story with non-stop action, her signature dry humor and a touch of romance, all perfectly balanced.”
  • Once Upon a Chapter says: “I really enjoyed the change in scenery since Alexia’s adventures took her all over the place this time and it added in new characters.”
  • My Thoughts… Literally says: “Another fantastic book in the Parasol Protectorate series. They are so fun and the perfect combination of action, adventure, mystery, and silliness.”
  • Delighted Readers says: “I went into this one wrongly assuming there would be a vast degree of angst when to my pleasure, the focus remained on intrigue, adventures, colorful characters, witty dialogue and fascinating steampunk gadgetry not in the usual way.”
 {Coop de Book: Gail’s monthly read along for September is The Forgotten Beasts of Eld by Patricia McKillip.}
Want more behind the scenes sneak peeks? Join the Chirrup

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

1901 President McKinley’s first stop on the Mexican border – at Del Rio, Texas., 1901 Southern Methodist University, Central University Libraries, DeGolyer Library (Source- notinthehistorybooks)

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Painting by Helleu, reminded me of Alexia

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

Things You Should Know Podcast: Is the Uncanny Valley Real?

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

PRO’s and CON’s of Fighting Book Piracy

Book News:

Rally the Readers says of Romancing the Inventor:

“I can’t emphasize enough that you can pick up this novella and enjoy it whether you’re completely new to the world or have read any number of other works set in it. If you loved the original Parasol Protectorate series like I did and always wondered what happened to Madame Lefoux, then definitely read Romancing the Inventor to find out; you won’t be disappointed!”

Quote of the Day:

 “I was born with a reading list I will never finish.”

~ Maud Casey

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? There’s a wiki for that!


4 Deleted Scenes from Blameless (Parasol Protectorate Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

Gentle Reader, here is a blast from the past for you. This blog post is all about extra bits relating to Blameless.

Blameless Cover Art

First off, we’ll start with the infamous cover art video!

Research & Characters

DELETED BITS from Blameless

In Which Alexia Compares Marriage to Kidnapping

Due, she suspected, entirely to the interference of Lord Conall Maccon, Earl of Woolsey, circumstances had arranged for Alexia to experience a series of kidnappings that culminated in a rather more long term version of the uncomfortable experience, if marriage can be referred to as such. Which, she felt, marriage to Lord Maccon, could be. Or was she, perhaps, besmirching the reputation of imprisonments everywhere through such a comparison?

Regardless, it appeared she was currently embroiled in yet another state of abduction. Although, it must be admitted, she wasn’t entirely certain that being confined to ones well-appointed room, with a delicious view of Italy’s premier artistic city could be, rightly, referred to as being kidnapped. It certainly was, so far, working out better than her marriage, but she did feel ever-so-slightly imprisoned. Since the Templars seemed to have discovered her weakness, and had been plying her with gnocchi and pesto for the entire day, she was, for the moment, disinclined to complain about the situation. She was even allowed regular trips to the library. She was not allowed into the city anymore, but this seemed a small price to pay for unending pesto and library privileges. However, as they appeared to believe they could keep her in such a state for the next seven months or so, she was figuring that at some point her love of the little green covered dumplings might deteriorate enough for her to contemplate escape. As it was, she was happy to chew and stare out into the orange glory of the Italian landscape with a head full of mild speculation and a hope for Floote and Genevieve’s safety.

Her peace was only broken by occasional visits from Mr. Lange-Wilsdorf, who insisted on running a series of intrusive and occasionally embarrassing tests, after which he would vanish once more, muttering to himself in his own language. No Templar, including the preceptor, intruded upon her peace and quiet, and if Alexia missed the bumbling clattering noises of Woolsey castle and its hairy inhabitants she did not admit it, even to herself. After the excitement of her European Tour so far, she was happy for the break, at least she was not running from anything, whacking at anyone, or passing out. Life, it might even be said, was looking up.

In Which the Origins of Ivy’s Letter are Discussed

Floote having – though some miraculous feet of butler-dum – hired a pony and trap to take their luggage back through the town, turned up at Alexia’s elbow. “If you are through here, madam?”
His tone, Alexia noticed, was unwarranted in its sharpness. “Something troubling you, Floote?”
“That letter is dangerous, madam.”
Alexia looked with shock at the innocent apple-blossom scented communiqué. “Is it really? Who would have thought?” Hurriedly she tucked it up one sleeve and followed her personal secretary towards the hired cart.
Floote explained. “Not in what in contains, madam, but in what it represents. If the honorable Mrs. Tunstell has managed to track us down here, then the vampires certainly cannot be far behind.”
Alexia considered the obsession. “Indeed. You raise very good question, Floote, how did Ivy manage such a thing?” She examined the outside of the letter. “It looks as though it came through to Monsieur Trouvé via your university contacts, Madame Lefoux. Your ghostly Aunt must have known where to send it and directed Ivy accordingly. I can’t imagine Ivy consulting with a ghost, but there you have it.”
“Oh dear,” Madame Lefoux looked apprehensive. “I did not mean to put any of my friends or scientific acquaintances in danger.”
Alexia nodded her agreement. “Nor I. After all, the vampires are after me. I do hope your associates remain unmolested. What about Monsieur Trouvé?”
Madame Lefoux sidled up to Alexia and nodded downwards. The Frenchwoman opened her tightly closed fist and flashed Alexia a peek of some small object she held clutched in her hand. It was a tiny brass octopus.
“Oh!” Alexia’s voice was soft. “Is that what was left sitting atop your hatbox! Is it a sign?”
Madame Lefoux began to explain in hushed tones, “Well, you see back when –”
Floote interrupted, sharply. “I think perhaps we ought to think on our own safety, for the moment, ladies.”

On the Danger of a Fly to One’s Reputation

Those few cabs that were available were all hansoms. While Alexia admitted a two-seat fly was speedy and agile, she couldn’t get over her feeling that it was a rather racy mode of transport for a mature lady. She preferred a proper coach. But she had to cast her scruples aside for Madame Lefoux and Floote swung themselves in with alacrity into the first fly that stopped and Alexia had no choice but to follow.

In Which Floote Talks (too much) About Alessandro Tarabotti

Floote cleared his throat delicately. “Perhaps we should return to our quarters, ladies. We are perilously close to being observed in familial proximity.”
Floote drew Alexia aside once they reached their apartments on a lower deck. Madame Lefoux having gone, so she said, to ‘handle the mustache.’
“He did come to see you once, madam. He watched you crawl about, from across Hyde Park, using a spyglass. You were still in nappies.”
“A spyglass? How reassuring.”
Floote gave a funny little half shoulder twitch that Alexia suspected was his version of a shrug. “If you knew Mr. Tarabotti, you would realize, that was practically a declaration of undying affection.”
“Not very demonstrative, my dad?”
“About as affectionate as a poisonous jellyfish, and just as easy to keep hold of.”
Alexia wrinkled her nose, “Yeach.”
“Just so, madam.”
Floote turned to leave.
“But Floote, I thought you liked my father.”
Floote’s perennially stiff back, stiffened ever so slightly more.
“Good evening, madam,” he said, in his no nonsense voice.
Alexia knew that tone well enough; she would get no more out of him tonight. “Good evening, Floote.”

Praise for Blameless

  • Review of Blameless in Portuguese by Over Shock.
    Lost in Librolandia says: “I cannot recommend this series enough! Honestly, if you are not reading Gail Carriger, you are severely deprived of the most amazing witty banter I have ever read. Her writing is superb!”
  • Blogger Lé Pimenta says: “O protetorado da sombrinha não é somente mais uma serie sobrenatural salpicada de romance ou vice versa e sim algo novo, criativo e descaradamente sarcástico que promove um enredo de tirar o fôlego e idéias novas sobre como misturar todo esse mundo que falei acima acrescentando a era vitoriana e personagens e objetos encontrados nos livros de ficção cientifica e é o desenvolvimento da ideia que faz com que cada novo livro da série seja único e divertidíssimo.”
  • Thanny of Who’s Thanny? says: “Os livros anteriores eram incríveis, mas esse aqui? Esse é espetacular! Com mais ação, como no primeiro livro, cheio de novas informações sobre a mitologia criada/explorada por Carriger e divertidíssimo como ela nunca tinha sido, passar por cada página do livro foi extremamente fácil assim que começado, e era com dor no coração que se chegava às últimas páginas.”
  • Britt Kris from For the Love of the Read says:
    “This is the third in the Parasol Protectorate series, and I enjoyed this one as much as the other two. The writing style follows the same pattern as the other books, with characters speaking in a dialogue appropriate for the indicated time period but also utilizes humor to keep the reader interested.”

{Coop de Book: Gail’s monthly read along for July 2017 is The Blue Sword by Robin McKinley.}

NOW IN DIGITAL, PRINT & AUDIO!

The Sumage Solution: San Andreas Shifters #1 by G. L. Carriger, now also in audio.
Contemporary m/m paranormal romance featuring a snarky mage and a gruff werewolf. Hella raunchy. Super dirty. Very very fun. Spin off of Marine Biology.

Can a gentle werewolf heal the heart of a smart-mouthed mage?

The Novel Approach says:

“And, while after years of reading shifter fantasy my fear is always that a storyline and its setting will feel stale and uninspired, Carriger manages to keep things fresh and progressive in not only the contemporary urban landscape but in the diversity, humor and warmth she uses to complement some of the weightier elements of Max and Biff’s story.”

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

1900 via @Nikolhistory Arte & Dintorni Classici Evert Jan Boks (1839-1914)

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

The Dumbo Octopus Is Eight Cute Legs of Stone Cold Murder

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

Are you guilty of these author press kit blunders? You can check Gail’s here.

Book News:

Books ft. Women Who Kick BUTT

Quote of the Day:

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? There’s a wiki for that!


German Parasol Protectorate Hardcovers ~ Cover REVEAL (sort of)

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

Well, Gentle Reader, I finally got around to hunting and pecking the interwebs to find my German Hardcover art.

I don’t hear much from my foreign publishers as a rule, but I did hear Germany was releasing the Parasol Protectorate in hardcover, although it seems they have only done the first three.

Anyway, here they are:

Soulless

 

Changeless

 

Blameless

I rather like them. They are very different from anything else I’ve ever had. And I do love RED.

You can read about the original covers for the German paperbacks, my mixed feelings (although I have come around), and the dubious title changes in my original post on the subject of the German translations. Discussion of the German editions and again concerning the relation to a certain Ivy outfit in Timeless.

German readers have embraced my books, for which I am most grateful. They are the first to bring out the Parasol Protectorate in both hardcover and trade with different cover art. They also have translated the manga editions into German. Read more about foreign covers and translations of this series on my wiki.

{Gail’s monthly read along for February is Terrier: The Legend of Beka Cooper Book 1 by Tamora Pierce.}

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

Ladies’ Cabinet Date-  Wednesday, July 1, 1846 Item ID-  v. 31, plate 25

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

michaelmoonsbookshop-tumblr
How sweet to revel in the world of books”
19th century illustration c1875

Your Tisane of Smart . . .
Octopus Gets Mental Workout with Hamster Ball

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  
5 Industry Issues for Authors to Watch in 2016

Book News:

Meanwhile On Facebook

Quote of the Day:
“He had just about enough intelligence to open his mouth when he wanted to eat, but certainly no more.”
~ P.G. Wodehouse


How the Victorians Described Italian Food for Blameless (Parasol Protectorate Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

For Blameless, Gentle Reader, when Alexia and cohorts traveled to Florence, I utilized my 1891 Baedeker’s Northern Italy extensively.

Unfortunately, I don’t have an earlier version, and a lot changed in Italy over the 20 years between Alexia’s time and this edition of the travel guide (a complete rail system appeared, for example). Nevertheless, a 1891 Baedeker’s is still better than my unreliable memories of the city (from when I was excavating near there some twenty years ago).

As I was reading along, in the wee hours of the night several years ago now, muttering to myself about all the things I would now have to go back and adjust in Blameless, I encountered an unintentionally hilarious section. Essentially, intended as a food guide, it was really Italian cuisine as defined by the Victorian British pallet. I re-encountered my notes on the subject recently, and thought you might find it entertaining.

Here are a few choice morsels for your amusement:

  • Antipasti: relishes taken as whets
  • Risotto: a kind of rice pudding (rich)
  • Salami: banger
  • Potaggio di pollo: chicken-fricassee
  • Funghi: mushrooms (often too rich)
  • Polenta: boiled maize
  • Gnocchi: small puddings

That last is my personal favorite. I can just see any one of my characters wafting into some Italian cafe and demanding a dish of those “delightful green covered tiny puddings.” You see how easily I amuse myself?

That’s why I was so obsessed with pesto in Blameless. This is one of the great pleasures of writing alternative history, I get to expound on the absurdity of the Victorian British abroad, but also use them as a vehicle through which I can expound on the absurdity of other cultures as well. As bad as Alexia can be about alien cuisine (she has much to say on the vileness of coffee, I must point out) you should see how she describes foreign mannerisms. The Italian language, for example, she cannot help but notice seems to be mainly comprised of “extravagant hand gestures.” And, with that, I had best get back to it.

Want more behind the scenes sneak peeks? Join the Chirrup

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

Godeys Dec 1872 Winter

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

via emporioefikz-tumblr Balloon Chandelier

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

Star Wars X-Wing Knife Block via Retro To Go

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  
AudioGals Guide to Romance Audio – Paranormal Romance

Book News:

Quote of the Day:
“Heaven is where the police are British, the chefs Italian, the mechanics German, the lovers French, and it’s all organized by the Swiss. Hell is where the police are German, the chefs are British, the mechanics French, the lovers Swiss, and it is all organized by the Italians.”
~ An oldie but a goodie


Trade Paperbacks of the Parasol Protectorate Coming to the US

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

Orbit is releasing the Parasol Protectorate books in trade paperback size to the US market! The first three will come out tomorrow, April 1, 2014 (Soulless, Changeless, and Blameless) and the last two on July 1, 2014.

They have done a slight makeover of the cover art as well, can you spot the differences?

Answering the inevitable questions…

  • None of the text has changed. Although the “other book” samples at the end of each may be different.
  • Yes, they are entirely phasing out the mass market editions. If you have been waiting to round out your MM collection or buy the boxed set I advise doing it sooner rather than later.
  • Yes, we are still trying for hard cover editions of the Parasol Protectorate series, but it seems unlikely. The Omnibus from SF Bookclub really are your only choice at the moment.
  • The Prudence books, however, will be released as small hard covers! Exciting. It is the binding of the future! As it were. (Speaking of which how can there be already 34 votes on Goodreads? No one, not even my editor, has seen this book yet. Ridiculous interwebs.)

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

Miss K with a red parasol.

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

My favorite from the Bouquets to Art at the de Young

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

I want this SO MUCH.

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

Book News:
Sobre Livros (Portugal) says of Soulless:

“The book is amazing, vibrant, funny … has a wonderful tone and narrative is full of mysteries. Before I even finished the first chapter I was completely enraptured. Alexia (our Miss. Taraboti) has a strong, insightful, sardonic and very courageous temperament.”

Quote of the Day:

“Neal had a gift for making someone want to punch him just for saying hello”

~ Tamora Pierce, Page


Steampunk Names & 1811 Professions (Finishing School Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

I don’t mean to be cagey, Gentle Reader, but tomorrow I have fun times here on the blog. Yes indeed, exciting stuff. Meanwhile, I give you this little gem off the Finishing School Tumblr:

And if you like, once you pick your name you can pick your profession…

1811 Slang Terms for Professions

  • Author ~ Quill
  • Brewer ~ Bung
  • Butler ~ Pantler
  • Coachman ~ Whip
  • Drummer ~ Sheepskin fiddler, Tormentor of sheepskin
    Fiddler ~ String, Gut scraper, Tormentor of catgut
  • Maid ~ Cinder garbler
  • Match-maker ~ Flesh broker
  • Parson ~ Spiritual flesh broker
  • Pimp ~ Cock bawd (A male keeper of a bawdy-house)
    Player ~ Buskin
  • Schoolmaster ~ Bum brusher, Haberdasher of pronouns

via the 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

1818 Tuesday, September 1 La Belle Assemblees v. 6, plate 40

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Berg Table Light by Northern Lighting

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

Chimney Humidifier designed by Takeshi Ishiguro

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

Book News:
Clarissa’s Bookshelf says of Etiquette & Espionage, “Carriger strikes a deft balance between arch humor and strong storytelling. Like Wodehouse and Wilde, she engages us in her characters’ lives while seeming to mock them, and even draws out unexpected moments of pathos.”

Quote of the Day:

“As long as war is regarded as wicked, it will always have its fascination. When it is looked upon as vulgar, it will cease to be popular.”

~ Oscar Wilde


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