Tagged Victorian Fashion

Dressing Alexia ~ From the Corset Up (Parasol Protectorate Special Extras)

I thought you might like a glimpse, Fashionable Reader, into some of the things that Alexia might wear underneath one of those amazing dresses of hers in the Parasol Protectorate series.

But first…

BUSTLES!

 1872 Ball Gown  Charles Fredrick Worth, 1872  The Metropolitan Museum of Art; Bustle 1873, Austrian, Made of cotton and horsehair

OK, so that’s what they were like during Soulless time period of early 1870s.

Ready?

Here we go!

Dressing Alexia from the Foundation Up

Godeys Aug 1872 Drawers
Stockings  1873  The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1875 Garter  1875-1825  The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Evening Shoes  1875-1885  The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1872 Corset  The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Corset Cover  1870  The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1872-1874  The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Petticoat  1873  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

And over the whole thing?

1870-1875 Bonnet   The Victoria & Albert Museum
1872 Ball Gown  Charles Fredrick Worth,  The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Cape  1870  The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Parasol 1880s  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 Wedding Fan  1877  The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

And what were the men wearing?

 1873-1875  The Victoria & Albert Museum; 1875-1880  The Los Angeles County Museum of Art

1875 Pocket Watch  Sotheby’s

This post first appeared on Retro Rack.

I hope you enjoyed this look beneath the scenes, as it were,

Yours in corsetry,

Miss Gail

  • Did you want more sneak peeks, free goodies, gossip, behind the scenes info? This stuff goes to my Chirrup members, because I love them bestest. Sign up here.
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OUT MAY 18, 2019!

The 5th Gender (a Tinkered Stars sci-fi as G. L. Carriger). COVER ART TO BE SEEN SOON BY THE CHIRRUP.

Sci-fi queer romance meets cozy mystery featuring a hot cop, the most adorable purple alien ever (lavender, pulease!), and a race with 5 genders.

UPCOMING SCRIBBLES

  • Reticence, The 4th and final Custard Protocol book. August 6, 2019
  • Secret Project Ommm, October 31, 2019 to celebrate the 10th Anniversary of Soulless.
  • Need to know what Gail is writing right now? That’s in the Chirrup.

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

Walking dress, 1878-80, Naples, Italy. via shewhoworshipscarlin Walking dress in two pieces (jacket and skirt) in gros effect violet taffetas, Sartoria Madame Grazini

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Lake Como, Italy 2000 by Gail Carriger

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

How to eat like a Victorian

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

Puschart Prize-Nominated Poet Accused Of Plagiarism By Numerous Poets

Book News:

I’m interviewed all about the marking side of publishing over on the SF/F Marketing podcast.

Quote of the Day:

“I like your name!”

“Thanks, I got it for my birthday.”

~ Borderlands Overheard in the Store

Your Moment of Gail

 

“I suspect it may be like the difference between a drinker and an alcoholic; the one merely reads books, the other needs books to make it through the day.”

(Interview with The Booklovers blog, September 2010)” ~ Gail Carriger

 

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? Wiki that sheez!


The Changing & Evolving Fashions of Late 1860s Victorian Dresses (Poison or Protect Special Extras)

Poison or Protect follows the exploits of one lady assassin with a penchant for poison, one gentle soldier with a white knight complex, a house party, a ghost, and…

The changing fashions of 1867.

No really, the diminishing nature of full skirts is a plot point.

I roll like that.

Even so, I can’t go all over with the info-dumping in the story itself, although I hope I’ve made the point as needed, so I thought I’d give you a glimpse at what I mean in further detail.

So here you have a peek at the evolving nature of skirts in the 1860s. I’ve chosen to give both fashion plates and actual dresses.

Fashion plate, 1860 V&A Museum no. E.267-1942

 

At the beginning of the 1860s dress skirts were very wide indeed, notably assisted by the cage crinoline.

“The steel-hooped cage crinoline, first patented in April 1856 by R.C. Milliet in Paris, and by their agent in Britain a few months later, became extremely popular.” (source)

1860  The Victoria & Albert Museum

By the end of the 1850s, the cage was hugely popular with the fashionable set as it allowed one to wear (slightly) fewer petticoats.

Note, however, that it was the height of vulgarity to see evidence of the cage in terms of steel rings or tapes (like VPL), so one did still require several petticoats over the crinoline to hide these.

A ruffle was often sewn on the bottom, which could be replaced with a different color to match the over-skirt.

Also the cage caused ladies to be vested in the need for longer underpinnings, should the cage swing too far when dancing. Hence the brief fad for pantalettes.

And now for the retrospective: 1860-1869

Emile Pingat, 1860  The Metropolitan Museum of Art
“Spring Pardessus, No. 2”, fashion plate from Harper’s Monthly Magazine, 1861
Evening Dress  Charles Fredrick Worth, 1861  The Chicago History Museum
Fashion plate, 1862 US, Godey’s Lady’s Book
1862  The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Fashion plate, 1863 England, the Englishwoman’s Domestic Magazine

 

As you can see, the early 1860s were very wide full skirts. But right around the middle the century they began to shift toward the back into a train…

Cage Crinoline  1862  The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1863  The McCord Museum
1864 (source)
1864  The Kyoto Costume Institute

1865 Dresses from the The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

Les Modes Parisiennes

Date: Sunday, January 1, 1865

Item ID: v. 44, plate 64

 

Note how the skirts are sliding more and more towards the back by this point? At the same time they become more narrow.

An advanced oval form of the cage crinoline became quite popular, but a lady was also permitted to wear layers of petticoats cleverly cut instead.

A discussion on this matter occurs in Poison or Protect, and is key to understanding Preshea’s character.

Godey’s Fashion Plate 1866
1866  Musée Galliera de la Mode de la Ville de Paris
Plate 39. December 1867.

Robe à Transformation  1867  Collection Galleria del Costume di Palazzo Pitti1

Fashion plate, 1868 England
Dinner Dress  Emile Pingat, 1868  The Philadelphia Museum of Art
1869_Englishwomans_Domestic_Magazine
1869  Collection Galleria del Costume di Palazzo Pitti

 

And so the style leads into the 1870s tighter bustle silhouette, as described in the Parasol Protectorate series.

Cage Crinolette  1872-1875  The Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Want more on these specific transition of styles?

I hope you have enjoyed this insight, Fashionable Reader.

Yours in ovals,

Miss Gail

  • Want more sneak peeks, free goodies, gossip, behind the scenes info? This stuff goes to my Chirrup members, because I love them bestest. Sign up here.
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OUT NOW!

The Omega Objection San Andreas Shifters

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Direct from Gail

Can a gentle giant with a trampled heart
show a man who’s been running all his life that
sometimes there are monsters worth running towards?

UPCOMING SCRIBBLES

  • The 5th Gender (a Tinkered Stars sci-fi as G. L. Carriger).
  • Reticence, The 4th and final Custard Protocol book. August 6, 2019
  • Secret Project Ommm, October 2019 to celebrate the 10th Anniversary of Soulless.
  • Need to know what Gail is writing right now? That’s in the Chirrup.

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of PArasol

Parasol Les Modes Parisiennes April, 1867 Plate Number v. 46, 36

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

An open letter to readers who love books

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

The Strange Magic of Libraries

Book News:

All Gail’s books in one place. 

Quote of the Day:

Your Moment of Gail

 

“I suspect it may be like the difference between a drinker and an alcoholic; the one merely reads books, the other needs books to make it through the day.”

(Interview with The Booklovers blog, September 2010)” ~ Gail Carriger

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? Wiki that sheez!


All Finished Young Ladies Have Chatelaines the Carte de Bal (Finishing School Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

One of the tools Sophronia and her friends often wear in my Finishing School series is the chatelaine, Fashionable Reader.

I used it as a kind of Swiss Army knife for my delightfully deadly young ladies. (Much as I do with the parasol in the Parasol Protectorate and Custard Protocol series.)

Chatelain artemis2apollo-tumblr
edwardian-time-machine-tumblr Silver Chatelaine, 1892

From Wikipedia: A Victorian Lady’s finishing touch ~ the chatelaine.

A chatelaine is a decorative belt hook or clasp worn at the waist with a series of chains suspended from it.

Each chain is mounted with a useful household appendage such as scissors, thimble, watch, key, vinaigrette, household seal, etc.

Chatelaines were worn by many housekeepers in the 19th century and in the 16th century Dutch Republic, where they were typically used as watch chains for the wealthy. Similar jewellery was also worn by Anglo Saxon women, as seen from the burial record, but its function is uncertain.

The name chatelaine derives from the French term châtelaine. 

same source as above

 

Sterling silver Victorian chatelaine (seamstress)

 

I love looking at these and thinking about what a female spy would carry instead. Poisons or defensive fluids instead of perfume (or as well as) for example…

Chatelaine c 1895 (typical)
Nurse’s_Chatelaine

 

shewhoworshipscarlin-tumblr  Chatelaine with calendar, late 1700s, France.

 

Specifically mentioned in the final Finishing School book, Manners & Mutiny, is the Carte de Bal. Essentially, the Carte de Bal is a Chatelaine specifically designed to go to a dance.

 

French fashion doll 1865 carte de bal

 

CarteDeBalArtNeauvuChateline ebay sale
same as above
Carte de Bal  1890s  Sotheby’s

Let’s play Spot That Chatelaine…

Lace (via Dennis A. Waters Fine Daguerreotypes)
facesoftheedwardianera:

(via Standing Women Dressed Alike | Photograph | Wisconsin Historical Society)

c. early 1900s

 

More on the history of the chatelaine: Show & Tell: A 19th Century Chatelaine

Chatelaine (USA), ca. 1860; silver, gold wash, ivory, enamel, glass. Cooper Hewitt/Smithsonian Institution

 

In addition to the chatelaine Sophronia utilizes a number of hair ribbons in the final Finishing School book. I found these two quotes to go with…

“High-coloured ribbons, flowered or figured, are decidedly vulgar.”

~ The Ladies’ Guide to True Politeness and Perfect Manners or, Miss Leslie’s Behaviour Book by Eliza Leslie (American 1864)

“Low-priced ribbons, for instance, are generally flimsy, tawdry, of ugly figures, and vulgar colours,—soon fading, and soon “getting into a string.”

~ The Ladies’ Guide to True Politeness and Perfect Manners or, Miss Leslie’s Behaviour Book by Eliza Leslie (American 1864)

Want more?

This post originally appeared on Retro Rack.

Yours in dangly goodness,

Miss Gail

  • Want more sneak peeks, free goodies, gossip, behind the scenes info? This stuff goes to my Chirrup members, because I love them bestest. Sign up here.
  • Not into newsletters? Get only new releases by following Gail on Amazon or BookBub!

OUT NOW!

The Omega Objection San Andreas Shifters

Amazon | Kobo | B&N | iBooks
Direct from Gail

Can a gentle giant with a trampled heart
show a man who’s been running all his life that
sometimes there are monsters worth running towards?

UPCOMING SCRIBBLES

  • The 5th Gender (a Tinkered Stars sci-fi as G. L. Carriger).
  • Reticence, The 4th and final Custard Protocol book. August 6, 2019
  • Secret Project Ommm, October 2019 to celebrate the 10th Anniversary of Soulless.
  • Need to know what Gail is writing right now? That’s in the Chirrup.

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

How to Vote in the 2019 Hugo Awards (And Why You Should Do It)

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

Best of “Hi, I’m a Writer in a Movie”

Book News:

Waistcoats & Weaponry DVD extras

Quote of the Day:

Your Moment of Gail

 

“I suspect it may be like the difference between a drinker and an alcoholic; the one merely reads books, the other needs books to make it through the day.”

(Interview with The Booklovers blog, September 2010)” ~ Gail Carriger

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? Wiki that sheez!


Victorian Clothing Terms Used in the Finishing School Books & What They Mean (Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

So Fashionable Reader,

I use a number of terms for articles of clothing in my Finishing School books.

Most of the time I’m aware that some of my readers aren’t familiar with the particulars. I try to use unfamiliar Victorian words in context that allows the reader to at least understand what kind of clothing it is (outerwear, underwear, upper body covering, lower, etc).

Nevertheless, here, for your edification, are some pictures of what these things actually look like!

Ever wondered as you read? Now you’ll know.

 

Agatha’s lace tuck:

Collar 1850s  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

Agatha’s lace tuck is always slipping.

You can think of it as kind of like a removable collar (see above) only it is worn around the lower part of the neckline of a deeper cut dress. It’s tucked in to hide some of the depth of cleavage. It’s prone to slipping because it is not stitched on.

Lace was expensive and you wanted to be able to reuse it. More common in the Regency Era prior to the Victorian Era, the lace tuck persisted in more conservative institutions through the 1850s until industrialized lace became inexpensive enough to stitch directly onto the necklines of dresses.

 

The pelerine or the fichu:

1850 Pelerine  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

A cape-like item worn so that peaks drape down in the front. Originally for warmth and modesty, later mostly decorative.

As the Victorian era progresses the pelerine came to mean longer point in the front while the fichu was smaller and more dainty.

 

Sophronia’s boots:

1851 Ankle Boots  The Victoria & Albert Museum

 

Sophronia’s boots have rubber soles, very unusual and uncommon right up through the turn of the century.

Most shoes had hard leather soles or softer ones for indoors (like dancing shoes still do today).

 

A basquine bodice:

1853 Basquine  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

In the Victorian era this term came to mean highly decorated jackets worn over ballgown bodices or wedding gowns. They were often used for travel, for example, to and from an event

 

Bonnet:

1853 Bonnet  The FIDM Museum

 

A bonnet is a hat worn close the the head and tilted back, often providing very little sun protection.

Hair styles evolved to compensate, so the 1850s saw hair divided in the middle with lots of curls around the face and tight buns to the back for daytime.

 

Pagoda sleeves:

1850 Day Dress  The Kyoto Costume Institute

 

These sleeves are narrow at the top and very wide at the bottom.

In the 1850s they mirror the silhouette of the rest of the dress and were hugely popular. Geraldine’s girls love them for hiding all their wrist tools.

They were popular for day and walking dresses. They rarely appear on dinner gowns, however, because they would drag through the food!

 

Hair receiver:

Reminisce: What Are Hair Receivers?

Hair receivers were used to collect all the hair that came off of one’s hairbrush each day. After sufficient hair was collected, one would take it in to a hair weaver who would make the hair into a fall or pad or clip curls to easily augment ones up-dos. I know, I know, weird yet strangely logical.

And for your amusement, just read this description of what they wore…

“For breakfast she had a pretty flowered dressing-gown. At ten she put on a simple buisness-like tailor-made costume for shopping in Peterport. On returning she changed into a workday dress and an overall for kitchen operations. The overall was removed for lunch, and then, for the afternoon, a really good dress was put on for paying calls. When we came back a little exhausted from this strain of looking well and being polite, a loose tea-gown was the thing, and this remained on until it was time to dress for dinner.”

~ The Victorian House by Judith Flanders

Seven different outfits of clothes for an ordinary day.

Yours in terminology,

Miss Gail

This post originally appeared in Retro Rack.

  • Want more sneak peeks, free goodies, gossip, behind the scenes info? This stuff goes to my Chirrup members, because I love them bestest. Sign up here.
  • Not into newsletters? Get only new releases by following Gail on Amazon or BookBub!

OUT NOW!

The Omega Objection San Andreas Shifters

Amazon | Kobo | B&N | iBooks
Direct from Gail

Can a gentle giant with a trampled heart
show a man who’s been running all his life that
sometimes there are monsters worth running towards?

UPCOMING SCRIBBLES

  • The 5th Gender (a Tinkered Stars sci-fi as G. L. Carriger).
  • Reticence, The 4th and final Custard Protocol book. August 6, 2019
  • Secret Project Ommm, October 2019 to celebrate the 10th Anniversary of Soulless.
  • Need to know what Gail is writing right now? That’s in the Chirrup.

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

The Different Types of Editing Explained

Book News:

Check out Soap’s character design board

Quote of the Day:

Your Moment of Gail

 

“I suspect it may be like the difference between a drinker and an alcoholic; the one merely reads books, the other needs books to make it through the day.”

(Interview with The Booklovers blog, September 2010)” ~ Gail Carriger

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? Wiki that sheez!


Some Thoughts on 1850s Victorian Fashion as featured in the Finishing School Books (Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

The Finishing School books go from 1851 ~ 1854, Fashionable Reader.

The silhouette itself remained basically unchanged throughout this time period. It wasn’t until the cage crinoline was introduced, after the final Finishing School book, that things moved quickly into new avenues.

I thought you might like to see a sample of 1850s dresses specific to this series.

1850  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

The tucked front and elaborate ruching was a hallmark of earlier dresses from the 1840s. As the period wore on, the front became smoother and shawl collars more popular, like so…

1850-1853  Musée Galliera de la Mode de la Ville de Paris

 

The sloped shoulder remained popular throughout this time period. Broad shoulders on women were considered unseemly, possibly because they were a mark of physical fitness and manual labor. (Can have THAT in hte upper crust. No no no.)

Day Dress  1850s  The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

 

That said, pagoda sleeves remained relatively popular, as the inverted triangle shape of the bodice, width of the sleeve and width of the dress all were thought to give the illusion of a smaller waist.

1852-1854  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

One of the reasons I chose this time period is that this style of dress is ideal for hidden skirt pockets full of stuff, not to mention devices up sleeves. There are ways to adapt these ridiculous dresses to espionage that fall away as the Victorian Era progresses.

1850 Waistcoat  1850s  The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

 

Very very Sophronia…

via steampunksteampunk tumblr

 

This post originally appeared in Retro Rack.

Yours in multiple petticoats,

Miss Gail

  • Want more sneak peeks, free goodies, gossip, behind the scenes info? This stuff goes to my Chirrup members, because I love them bestest. Sign up here.
  • Not into newsletters? Get only new releases by following Gail on Amazon or BookBub!

OUT NOW!

The Omega Objection San Andreas Shifters

Amazon | Kobo | B&N | iBooks
Direct from Gail

Can a gentle giant with a trampled heart
show a man who’s been running all his life that
sometimes there are monsters worth running towards?

UPCOMING SCRIBBLES

  • The 5th Gender (a Tinkered Stars sci-fi as G. L. Carriger).
  • Reticence, The 4th and final Custard Protocol book. August 6, 2019
  • Secret Project Ommm, October 2019 to celebrate the 10th Anniversary of Soulless.
  • Need to know what Gail is writing right now? That’s in the Chirrup.

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Madame Askew & the Grand Arbitrar

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

A southern Chinese gamble pays off: high mountain Oolong tea

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

KU Availability

Book News:

Check out Bumbersnoot’s character design board

Quote of the Day:

Your Moment of Gail

 

“I suspect it may be like the difference between a drinker and an alcoholic; the one merely reads books, the other needs books to make it through the day.”

(Interview with The Booklovers blog, September 2010)” ~ Gail Carriger

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? Wiki that sheez!


Lovely Finishing School Group Cosplay by Natalie Gerber’s Sewing Class (Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

I have made no bones over the fact, Gentle Reader, that I love cosplay.
I may have a contentions relationship with some other expressions of fan love, but never cospay.
I come out of cosplaying extensively as a girl. I enjoy the idea of putting a personal visual spin on characters without risk of trademark infringement, merely out of love.
I relish seeing the creativity, and I generally try to get photographs with people cosplaying my character should I meet them in person.

Group Finishing School Teachers Cosplay (photo by Talon Squires)

However, I rarely have the bandwidth to do dedicated blog posts here on the subject. This time is a bit different.
Natalie contacted me to tell me she was running a course with a group of young scholars (ages 14-18 various skill levels) on cosplay and they were doing my book. I was delighted. She also gave me permission to post about it so here we are!
Students were each given a copy of Etiquette & Espionage. They discussed the book, setting, and impact of social expectations (now and in the past). They had a lesson on Victorian fashions and steampunk. Then they each chose their favorite character and worked on character development and design sketches.
They used thrift stores, home depot and craft stores (lots of re-purposed tablecloths and sheets).
These amazing students did these outfits in seven days (or less). On the last day, the went for tea and a photo shoot.

Here’s Some Costumes in Detail

Teachers

MADEMOISELLE GERALDINE

Meme Geraldine Cosplay (photo by Talon Squires)

  • Is portrayed by the amazing teacher of this course, the lovely Natalie, who relayed to me all the images and the stories from behind the sewings!
  • One of the students challenged her to make a costume too. It was made in three days with student help.
  • The hat holds makeup brushes, a fork, spoon, and eyelash curler.

PROFESSOR BRAITHWOPE

Professor Braithwope Cosplay photo by Natlie Gerber

  • Based design off a line in E&E that mentions a crimson top hat.
  • Sewed the trousers from scratch!

PROFESSOR LEFOUX

Professor Lefoux Cosplay (photo by Robert Yeritsyan) 

  • Coat made from scratch!
  • Carries all the keys to the school on belt.

LADY LINETTE

Lady Linette Cosplay (photo by Robert Yeritsyan)

  • The corset got lots of love proving that there may be a little of Lord Akeldama in all of us.
  • Not pictured is “The Tassel Mobile” a scooter covered top to bottom in upholstery tassels.

Neither Teacher nor Student

PICKLEMAN

Vieve & Pickleman Cosplay (photo by Robert Yeritsyan)

  • The Pickleman’s hat was made using cardboard and fabric
  • Non-canon creative embellishment: The green epaulettes signify rank. Four loops means very high up.

VIEVE

Vieve Cosplay (photo by Talon Squires)

  • Coat and inside of the hat are filled with various tools.
  • Made an obstructor as well!

SOAP

Soap Cosplay (photo by Talon Squires)

  • There wasn’t a student in the class of African descent, but this young man is Korean and related to Soap.
  • Has a bag on his hip with a bottle of soap in it.

Natalie reported:

“When we arrived at tea, he sat by the fire place and would not move until invited to sit by Mademoiselle Geraldine herself. He also kept pocketing sandwiches and scones.”

Which just about broke my heart.

Students

MONIQUE

Monique Cosplay (photo by Talon Squires)

  • The skirt is hand-tufted and the burgundy lace is a subtle nod to vampire ties.
  • Non-canon creative embellishment: Epaulette is one only allowed to older girls, when she was demoted, her’s was removed. She stole it back and reattached (which is why it looks a little tattered).

PRESHEA

Preshea Cosplay (photo by Talon Squires)

  • The crinoline has 50 yards of tulle in it.
  • Bodice and skirt are hand-painted!

SIDHEAG

Sidheag Cosplay (photo by Talon Squires)

  • Has several silver details, in case one of the uncles loses control.
  • The epaulettes hide three wooden spikes.

SOPHRONIA

  • Made one dress out of two because Sophronia was always making over her sister’s dresses.
  • Straps down the front of the skirt can buckle and shorted it for climbing.

DIMITY

Dimity Cosplay (photo by Talon Squires)

  • Wanted to embrace a bold color palette.
  • Hat is affectionately called “The Panty Hat.” (Ordered a corset that wasn’t used. It arrived with a matching thong. The group had a lot of laughs about how Dmity would feel about having a thong. Ultimately, it got made it into a hat and some of the lace also went on the glasses

I have to say this last made me giggle. We used to do something called “iron chef cosplay” at conventions. It was usually:

Gail’s chums make a hat out of anything on this table (in the hotel room) using a hot glue gun, because Gail was an idiot and forgot her hat… again.


This tiny admirals hat was made using a BayCon program, a paper cup, a stapler, scraps of fabric, undies, a badge, and a hot glue gun. Over 25 years ago. It’s still in good working condition.

Gentle Reader, I do hope you enjoyed this particular post. I must say the ingenuity, enthusiasm, and skill of these students made me well up. And perhaps it was partly nostalgia for my early fangirl cosplay days.
I was about his age when I started. I wrote a book about students this age. And now students of that age are cosplaying my characters. It’s all very meta.
And rather wonderful.
I don’t know about you, Gentle Reader, but this kind of thing gives me hope.
Yours in sentiment,
Miss Gail
P.S. If you’re interested in more cosplay my characters, there is both an extensive wikia entry gallery and a Pinterest board.
  • Did you want more behind the scenes info? This stuff goes to my Chirrup members, because I love them bestest. Sign up here.
  • Not into newsletters? Get only new releases by following Gail on Amazon or BookBub!

OUT NOW!

The Omega Objection San Andreas Shifters

Amazon | Kobo | B&N | iBooks
Direct from Gail

Can a gentle giant with a trampled heart
show a man who’s been running all his life that
sometimes there are monsters worth running towards?

UPCOMING SCRIBBLES

  • The 5th Gender (a Tinkered Stars sci-fi as G. L. Carriger).
  • Reticence, The 4th and final Custard Protocol book. August 6, 2019
  • Secret Project Ommm, October 2019 to celebrate the 10th Anniversary of Soulless.
  • Need to know what Gail is writing right now? That’s in the Chirrup.

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

PRIDE & PREJUDICE Covers Roundup

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

28 Of The Best Jobs for Book Lovers of All Shapes and Sizes

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

Top Ten Peeves of creative writing teachers

Book News:

Finishing School Fan Art by Willa

Quote of the Day:


Dressing Sophronia from the Corset Up (Finishing School Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

Good day Fashionable Reader,

Today I’m posting all about what Sophronia was wearing under all those floofy dresses I describe in the Finishing School series. These books take place in the 1850s before the crinoline so the underpinnings are rather interesting.

For those of us who are obsessed with such things.

I hope you enjoy this, I had a lot of fun pulling it together.

A dress like this, worn as a daytime garment for classes:

1850s Ensemble  Nordiska Museet

 

Sophronia might also carry:

1850s Parasol  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

Or perhaps…

1867 Fan Souvenir de l’exposition universelle

Her first layer under that outfit:

Under the dress above, she’d be wearing something like this:

Accessory Set 1850s  The Metropolitan Museum of Art: a lace tuck or collar, and sleeve extensions.
Corset Cover  1864-1868  The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Stocking  1860  Les Arts Décoratifs
Shoes  1854-1860  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

There would also be gloves, of course.

The next Layer under that:

Underneath those we have…

 Corset  Roxy Ann Caplin, 1851  The Museum of London

1855-1865  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

Likely there would also be something like split drawers, but I couldn’t find a good image from this particular time period.

Note that there is no cage crinoline, it is introduced to England after the Finishing School series.

Similar foundation garments might go under Sophronia’s transformation gown.

The Transformation Gown

If she were going out visiting and paying calls she would wear this:

Robe à Transformation  1855  The Metropolitan Museum of Art2

 

With these over it:

Accessory Set  1850s  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

And for an evening ball, this version of the dress…

1855 Robe à Transformation  1855  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

With these in her hair:

1850 Headdress & Bouquet  Mid 19th Century   MFA

 

And this to ward off the chill:

Cape  1855  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

This post originally appeared on Retro Rack.

Yours in perpetual transformation,

Miss Gail

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Waistcoats & Weaponry Breaking Down the Cover ~ Sophronia’s Fan (Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

On the cover of Waistcoats & Weaponry, Gentle ReaderSophronia is holding a fan.

I don’t interfere much with my cover art often or I try not too. I think Little Brown did a great job.

But for Waistcoats & Weaponry I really pushed the fan. I mean it’s key to the plot and Sophronia’s favorite.

I even went so far as to mail my fan to New York so it could be a prop in the photo shoot. I cannot tell you how delighted I am that they used it.

 Here I am with the actual fan at Anomaly Con a few years ago, sporting the fan.

You can see how they added in the blades with PhotoShop to Sophronia’s version? After all she is deadly and I’d never get a bladed fan through TSA.

Mine if from Brute Force Studios. (There is also a black version!)

Hooray! Love the fans.

Godeys Sept 1872 Fan
1900 Folding Fan  China, early 20th century  The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

 

Do you want more on Sophronia and fans?

Yours in Fannish Glory,

Miss Gail

This post originally appeared in Retro Rack.

  • Want more sneak peeks, free goodies, gossip, behind the scenes info? This stuff goes to my Chirrup members, because I love them bestest. Sign up here.
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OUT NOW!

The Omega Objection San Andreas Shifters

Amazon | Kobo | B&N | iBooks
Direct from Gail

Can a gentle giant with a trampled heart
show a man who’s been running all his life that
sometimes there are monsters worth running towards?

UPCOMING SCRIBBLES

  • The 5th Gender (a Tinkered Stars sci-fi as G. L. Carriger).
  • Reticence, The 4th and final Custard Protocol book. August 6, 2019
  • Secret Project Ommm, October 2019 to celebrate the 10th Anniversary of Soulless.
  • Need to know what Gail is writing right now? That’s in the Chirrup.

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Your Infusion of Cute . . .

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“I suspect it may be like the difference between a drinker and an alcoholic; the one merely reads books, the other needs books to make it through the day.”

(Interview with The Booklovers blog, September 2010)” ~ Gail Carriger

 

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? Wiki that sheez!

 


Behind the Scenes Pretties in How to Marry a Werewolf! Claw & Courtship (Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

Now that How the Marry a Werewolf has hit the world I can give you some sneaky behind the scenes stuff, Gentle Reader!

How about some of the hats and dresses mentioned in the story? Well you can check out the inspiration Pinterest board for How to Marry a Werewolf!

Want my ideas on casting Faith, the main character from this book? Some of her favorite dresses and my vintage inspiration for this character? Check her out on Pinterest.

Want to look at how I imagine Teddy?

Just because…

Channing!

Teddy & Faith Fooling Around

How to Marry was very much inspired by Heyer’s work, this one is on sale today!

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How to Marry a Werewolf (In 10 Easy Steps) ~ A Claw & Courtship Novella by Gail Carriger features a certain white wolf we all love to hate (except those of us weirdos who love to love him).

Guilty of an indiscretion? Time to marry a werewolf.

Rejected by her family, Faith crosses the Atlantic, looking for a marriage of convenience and revenge. But things are done differently in London. Werewolves are civilized. At least they pretend to be.

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

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How To Organize Your Cords

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If You’re Not Sure How a Male Author Would Describe You, Use This Handy Chart

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Quote of the Day:

“I love walking into a bookstore. It’s like all my friends are sitting on shelves, waving their pages at me.”

~ Tahereh Mafi

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Some Silly 1890s Hats For Ivy & Primrose (Custard Protocol Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

Just some fun hats for you today, Fashionable Reader. I’m thinking of Ivy, or Primrose, or what Ivy might buy for Primrose.

Allen & Ginter (American, Richmond, Virginia)
Wait for Escort, from the Parasol Drills series (N18) for Allen & Ginter Cigarettes Brands, 1888

If you haven’t found it already this kind of thing shows up on the Retro Rack Group quite a bit, and there you can also share your own.

Feathers!

Allen & Ginter (American, Richmond, Virginia)
Patrol, from the Parasol Drills series (N18) for Allen & Ginter Cigarettes Brands, 1888

Dead Bird!

Allen & Ginter (American, Richmond, Virginia)
Not Engaged, from the Parasol Drills series (N18) for Allen & Ginter Cigarettes Brands, 1888

Flowers!

Allen & Ginter (American, Richmond, Virginia)
Right Shoulder Arms, from the Parasol Drills series (N18) for Allen & Ginter Cigarettes Brands, 1888

This last one I think is particularly Ivy!

 

Allen & Ginter (American, Richmond, Virginia)
Parade Rest, from the Parasol Drills series (N18) for Allen & Ginter Cigarettes Brands, 1888

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GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

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Dear Lord Akeldama ~ Gifts, Endearments & Peas

Posted by Gail Carriger

Please welcome the gentleman vampire back to my blog this week, Gentle Reader!

As always Lord Akeldama may not give you the answer you wish, he always gives the question the answer it deserves.

With Biffy & Lyall’s book on the horizon, I may invite the werewolves over for a round, perhaps you have questions for them?

Rudderbuddy asks:

Where did you get you love for food and floral related nicknames?

You can think of a better source of endearments?

Melissa asks:

When visiting the home of a new acquaintance for the first time, what is the most appropriate gift, or is a gift necessary?

I’m always in favor of something small and edible ~ chocolates, bubbly, svelte young men with sparkling eyes and questionable moral fiber.

Jessica asks:

What is the best possible way to go about mixing patterns in fashion choices?

Keep your colors close and your sizes separate. In other words, mix a large pattern with a small one, but make sure they are both black & white.

Mandy asks:

What fashions would you put a butterfly of a toddler in, considering that she likes to run and climb…

Waistcoat and trousers, naturally, darling. Or perhaps a very small lab coat emblazoned with “evil genius in training,” just to keep everyone around watchful.

Court suit Uncut voided silk velvet, silk faille, silk embroidery floss, gold & silver embroidery purl & frieze, rhinestone & metal sequins c. 1810-14

Sharon asks:

I’m considering becoming a vampire queen. Suggestions? Hints?

Endeavor to be as fabulous as possible.

Tracy asks:

If one has an extensive library, do you recommend shelving them by height, color, or some other system?

Color, setting, and approval rating.

Avery asks:

If one must color one’s hair and belonging to the male gender with pale olive skin would you advise, ginger or blonde or black?

Black, my darling little eliá.

Irene asks:

If one is setting up a network of secret agents, what is the best type of training for them: espionage, assassination, accountancy, or a combination?

Never forget table manners, wardrobe selection, and hat decoration. Oh and the consumption of peas. Peas always give trouble to those who have not been trained properly.

 

Want to ask Lord Akeldama a question? Join the Chirrup

{Coop de Book: Gail’s monthly read along for October 2017 is Dealing with Dragons by Patricia C. Wrede.}

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

1905 (Source- pinterest.com) via fawnvelveteen tumblr

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Why octopuses are building small “cities” off the coast of Australia

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Quote of the Day:

“I have only two things to say to you, Lord Tilbury. One is that you have ruined a man’s life. The other is Pip-pip.”

~ P.G. Wodehouse

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? There’s a wiki for that!


Dear Lord Akeldama ~ On Fashion, Feminism, & Faux

Posted by Gail Carriger

Please welcome the gentleman vampire back to my blog this week, Gentle Reader. As always Lord Akeldama is happy to entertain your questions, although he may not give you the answer you wish, he always gives your question the answer it deserves.

via celuloid-jam tumblr

And now…

Dear Lord Akeldama

Lisa asks:

Since you are a master of subtle manipulation, how would you get a teenage boy to clean up after himself without seeming to nag?

Keep him company in his own room until it is clean. Set up residence with a book. Nothing is more off-putting to a young gentleman than lack of privacy and constant exposure to his own parent. Other option? Offer to clean it yourself… and Instagram the most embarrassing things you find.

Christopher asks:

What do you think of Hawaiian shirts for very casual daywear?

I try not to think about them at all.

Alicia asks:

How do you politely tell someone to stuff it?

I find turning my head away, finding that something vastly interesting has caught my attention elsewhere, and simply drifting off works wonders.

Pamela asks:

What to do when one’s physical limitations demand practical shoes?

Do not go anywhere.

Mara asks:

What is a lady of reputable breeding and with a tendency to go against the social norm to do to when faced with stupid and boring ladies who think a woman’s sense in life are clothes, marriage, and children.

Write.

Jack asks:

Flossing or just brushing?

What a silly question to ask a man who has a liquid diet.

Court Suit, ca 1810

Fiona asks:

How do you feel about the Faux trend: i.e. Faux fur, Faux Leather, T-shirts with tuxedos printed on them, leggings printed to look like jeans.

Is fashion not, at its heart and soul, entirely motivated by deception and manipulation? Trompe-l’œil away, my sneaky darlings, visual espionage is an ancient tradition. The Romans did it with walls.

Cherries asks:

Honorable sir, what should one do when a present has been given, but no thanks has been offered in the form of a card or note or even…gasp…an email?

Assume that the present was either undelivered, unacceptable, insulting, or unwelcome. Whatever the case, do not bestow another.

FanArtLordADandy-Maker-DollDivine

Liza asks:

Lord Akeldama, pray tell, what is your favorite book?

I am rather partial to Mr. Wilde’s Picture of Dorian Gray. There are some who have speculated that it is about me. I assure you there is no painting in my garret. Although there is this fresco in a stairwell in the British Museum… Of course, The Vampyre is a work of pure comic genius, always good of a laugh.

Like Lord Akeldama? Look out for Manifest Destiny in my next book, Kitsune Drag Queen extraordinaire.

Want to ask Lord Akeldama a question? Join the Chirrup

{Gail’s Coop de Book for May 2017 is Radiance by Grace Draven.}

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

1900 Longchamp, France Antique-Royals tumblr2

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

40 Unique Teapots to Help You Savour the Taste of Tea

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Keeping Time in the Victorian Kitchen

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“Writers don’t forget the past; they turn it into raw material.”

~ Joyce Rachelle

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“It is never difficult to distinguish between a Scotsman with a grievance and a ray of sunshine.”

~ P.G. Wodehouse

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