Tagged PRUDENCE

The REAL Reason the Custard Protocol is Set in the 1890s (Special Extras)

The sleeves, Fashionable Reader. So ridiculous, how could I resist?

via  Robbie Rozelle @divarobbie  We are at puffed sleeves! #AnneofGreenGables

“Tomorrow is always fresh, with no mistakes in it yet.”

~ L.M. Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables

edwardian-time-machine tumblr sleeve supports
fripperiesandfobs-tumblr Jacket ca. 1894 From Thierry de Maigret
andwomenworebloomers tumblr

And the steampunk elements are pretty cool too.

arsenicinshell tumblr

Retro Rack is also on facebook where I post additional images and fashion thoughts.

Doesn’t this lady look like she went to Finishing School?

1894. Is that a  weapon in her hair? 

Yours in velvet,

Miss Gail

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OUT NOW!

The 5th Gender (A Tinkered Stars Mystery as G. L. Carriger).

Amazon | Elsewhere | Direct from Gail
Audio is coming. 

Sci-fi queer romance meets cozy mystery in which a hot space station cop meets the most adorable purple alien ever (lavender, pulease!) from a race with 5 genders.

Sia (@raenbowgirl) on Twiiter said: 

“Super sweet sci-fi romance, really cool exploration of non-binary gender identities, with just a little bit of naughty tentacle shenanigans. Full review here.

UPCOMING SCRIBBLES

  • Reticence, The 4th and final Custard Protocol book. Aug 6, 2019
  • Fan Service Omnibus (SOLD OUT), Oct 2019 to celebrate the 10th Anniversary of Soulless.
  • Need to know what Gail is writing right now? That’s in the Chirrup.

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

Spring Morning by James Tissot c. 1875 (@metmuseum)

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

“The bottle rules the sensual world, but the tea-cup is queen in all the fair dominions.”

~ Around the Tea Table, by T. De Witt Talmage (c.1895)

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

“You have to write the book that wants to be written. And if the book will be too difficult for grown-ups, then you write it for children.”

~ Madeleine L’Engle

Book News:

“Someone was trying to kill Lady Alexia Maccon. It was most inconvenient, as she was in a dreadful hurry. Given her previous familiarity with near-death experiences and their comparative frequency with regards to her good self, Alexia should probably have allowed extra time for such a predictable happenstance.”

~ Gail Carriger

Quote of the Day:

“I would be most content if my children grew up to be the kind of people who think decorating consists mostly of building enough bookshelves.”

~ Anna Quindlen

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? Wiki that sheez!


Prudence Research ~ India’s Influence on Victorian Clothing in the Custard Protocol series (Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

So I took Rue to India in the first Custard Protocol book, Prudence. (Which the Read Along is tackling right now.) It was a lot of fun for the both of us. And, since it’s me, I also kept an eye open to the fashion world. India was an occupied territory during the Victorian times, and fabrics and fashion moved from there across the world and into the lives of Victorians in a myriad of ways. Here are some of the influential images, fashion items, and styles that come up in my books when India is involved.

1885 Visite  Les Arts Décoratifs

Not all of the images I collected are strictly Indian. Some are from surrounding occupied territories or highlight other Silk Road influences. Nevertheless, they struck me as quite interesting, so I have presented them for you here.

Fancy Dress Costume  Charles Fredrick Worth, 1870  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

I dithered on how to show these. I went with some original historical clothing items, along with some Victorian and later takes on the same theme and, where possible, a modern fashion look. Also there’s jewelry! So it’s kinda a mess, but I still hope you enjoy it.

Pendant  1860  Bonham’s

17th-18th century  The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
1867  Les Arts Décoratifs
Pietro Yantorny, 1920  The Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Evening Dress  late 1910s  The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
19th Radhakrishna pendant  India, 19th century  Christie’s

 

1855 via fashionsfromhistory-tumblr Dressing Gown MFA
Court Ensemble  India (Lucknow), 19th century  The Victoria & Albert Museum
1820 Turban The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

Evening Dress 1893  The Museum of London

“This evening dress is decorated with net panels embroidered with gold thread and beetle wing cases from a species of jewel beetle. The panels were probably made in India where Madras and Calcutta were centres for beetle-wing embroidery made for the European market. The iridescent blue-green beetle wing cases reflect the light like sequins. This type of embroidery is found in British museum collections on dress, textiles and accessories dating from the 1780s until about 1930. Although Indian embroiderers introduced the technique, using it to decorate dress and domestic textiles, Europeans copied them, sometimes using the wing cases of a species of South American jewel beetle. This style of embroidery was also thought to be a suitable pastime for ladies of leisure, who were advised to use a Walker’s number eight needle and green silk thread.”


 Dress  Weeks, 1910  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Shirt  India (Bikaner), 1850s  The Victoria & Albert Museum
Opal Bracelet  1900  Christie’s
Fancy Dress Costumes  Paul Poiret, 1913-1914  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

Necklace  India, 19th century  Sotheby’s

 

Jama  India, 17th century  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

Court Robe  India, 18th century  The Victoria & Albert Museum

 

Necklace  India (Rajasthan), 19th century  Christie’s

 

Choga  India, late 19th century  The Metropolitan Museum of Art

More like this?

A variation of this post originally appeared in Retro Rack.

Yours (ever obsessed with sari fabric and Indian textiles),

Miss Gail

  • Want free goodies, gossip, behind the scenes info? This stuff goes to my Chirrup members, because I love them bestest. Sign up here.
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OUT NOW!

The 5th Gender (A Tinkered Stars Mystery as G. L. Carriger).

Amazon | Elsewhere | Direct from Gail
Audio is coming. 

Sci-fi queer romance meets cozy mystery in which a hot space station cop meets the most adorable purple alien ever (lavender, pulease!) from a race with 5 genders.

UPCOMING SCRIBBLES

  • Reticence, The 4th and final Custard Protocol book. Aug 6, 2019
  • Fan Service Omnibus (SOLD OUT), Oct 2019 to celebrate the 10th Anniversary of Soulless.
  • Need to know what Gail is writing right now? That’s in the Chirrup.

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

Englishwoman’s Domestic Magazine Date September, 1872

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Baby Primrose?

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

The History Chicks podcast on Pirate Queen Ching Shih

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

History Wasn’t White. Why Should Historical Fiction Be?

Book News:

The Shameful Narcissist says of Soulless:

“…it’s truly the characters and world that give Soulless its spirit.”

Quote of the Day:

“The fact that it’s tactless doesn’t make it untrue.”

~ Borderlands Books Hillarious “Overhead in the store” April News

Your Moment of Gail

 

“I suspect it may be like the difference between a drinker and an alcoholic; the one merely reads books, the other needs books to make it through the day.”

(Interview with The Booklovers blog, September 2010)” ~ Gail Carriger

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? Wiki that sheez!


Prudence Special Extras (Custard Protocol Special)

Prudence is the first book in my Parasol Protectorate spin off series, focused on the next generation with a group dynamic and a caper bent.

Prudence released in April of 2015

Here are some fun blog posts and resources that tie to this book, like researching India.

Prudence was probably the hardest book I ever had to write, it hit the NYT through dint of being on special offer (I think) in both ebook and hardcover when it launched. This was the first time Orbit released me in hardcover and this series got confused (by bookstores) with my YA series as a result.

Introducing the Custard Protocol series, in which Prudence travels to India for Queen, country…and the perfect pot of tea.

Prudence was a New York Times and USA Today bestseller, an Amazon Best Book Pick in Romance and Sci-Fi/Fantasy categories, and Library Reads pick.

Writing Prudence

When I started this new series I had to not only go back a see where I left things in the world, after Timeless (plus 20 years) I also hard to research what was going on around the world at the time. So there was a lot of background work to do before I even started the story.

Here’s what my desk looked like when I was doing that…

As I started actually writing Prudence, I realized it was not going to be possible for me to write this story while I was still writing the final Finishing School books.

This meant I had to ask my publisher for a delay. I talk all about this creative crisis in this blog post…

Analytical Versus Creative or Why Gail’s Life Went Bang

Going through this process actually made me trust you, my fans, a great deal more than I had previously.

I thought you would be mad at me, or harsh, about the fact that I had to take a delay on Prudence. But instead you were universally kind and understanding.

It’s for this reason I am a lot more honest with my reader base about my creative challenges than many authors I know.

Anglicization – In Which We Revisit the Ladybird Problem (Occasional FAQ)

Inspiration, Disinfectant Sunflowers & Praise for Gail Carriger’s Prudence (Behind the Magic of the Custard Protocol)

Things Pertaining to This Book

7 Deleted Scenes for Gail Carriger’s Prudence (Custard Protocol Special Extras)

Retro Rack posts on the fashion in the Custard Protocol Series:

Rue wears this outfit in Chapter 10: Egypt

Cutwork Leather Boots, ca. 1890 via Chicago History Museum, Parasol 1890s  The Metropolitan Museum of Art, dress 1890s  Nordiska Museet.

Aren’t you mad for the boots? I wrote the whole scene around them.

All About Parasols, What Do Prim/Rue/Alexia’s Actually look like? (Parasol Protectorate & Custard Protocol Special Extras)

All About Romance says of the Prudence audiobook:

“It took just minutes to realize that Moira Quirk is the perfect narrator for this book, bringing the right sense of humor and tone to every character. Yes, indeed, some are rather over the top – Lord Akeldama most notably – but that’s exactly how Ms. Carriger writes the characters.”

Prudence Stuff in a Cubby in my office

Prudence Stuff in a Cubby in my office

The Smut Report says of Prudence:

“The story takes delight in its own absurdity, which makes it utterly a true pleasure to read.”

Rue Quesnel Prim Percy by Ace Artemis

I hope you’ve enjoyed these bits and bobs about Prudence.

Yours in perpetual research,

Miss Gail

  • Want more sneak peeks, free goodies, gossip, behind the scenes info? This stuff goes to my Chirrup members, because I love them bestest. Sign up here.
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OUT NOW!

The 5th Gender (A Tinkered Stars Mystery as G. L. Carriger).

Amazon | Elsewhere | Direct from Gail
Audio is coming. 

Sci-fi queer romance meets cozy mystery in which a hot space station cop meets the most adorable purple alien ever (lavender, pulease!) from a race with 5 genders.

UPCOMING SCRIBBLES

  • Reticence, The 4th and final Custard Protocol book. Aug 6, 2019
  • Fan Service Omnibus (sold out), Oct 2019 to celebrate the 10th Anniversary of Soulless.
  • Need to know what Gail is writing right now? That’s in the Chirrup.

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

Day dress, 1895-96 From the Cincinnati Art Museum

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Similar fashion plate 1896 via cimetiere-chanson- tumblr

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

Toss Me a Salad

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

Patreon, Copyright, & Personal Choice

Book News:

Soulless Illustrated cover has been nominated Chesley award! Here’s the full list.

Quote of the Day:

I’ve just made a revelatory discovery. I believe my jam ranking has shifted, this late in the game, from: 1. Raspberry 2. Cherry to 1. Cherry 2. Raspberry. I know. Shocking twist!

~ Self on Twitter

Your Moment of Gail

 

“I suspect it may be like the difference between a drinker and an alcoholic; the one merely reads books, the other needs books to make it through the day.”

(Interview with The Booklovers blog, September 2010)” ~ Gail Carriger

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? Wiki that sheez!


All About Parasols, What Do Prim/Rue/Alexia’s Actually look like? (Parasol Protectorate & Custard Protocol Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

Today, my darling Gentle Reader, I want to talk to you about my great love and passion, the humble parasol!

Alexia carries several Parasols through the course of the Parasol Protectorate and passes on various others to her daughter, and her daughter’s best friend, Primrose.

When conceiving the original parasol I went off of this kind of style:

1895 via @AngelaKCouch Twitter Parasol, design c.1895-1900

Here it is as I had it sketched some ten years ago (with steampunk gadget action).

And my sketch of Alexia carrying it looked like this:

Here’s an 1875 fashion plate, playing with a similar style.

If you are look for something online for an Alexia cosplay, I feel like this one most closely resembles this original parasol (which she eventually loses) is here for $24.

 

Through the course of the Parasol Protectorate series I realized that I needed to give here something bigger and more exciting. I ran across this style of parasol from the 1890s…

I love the shape, I’m a bit mad for anything approaching sphere shaped. So here is the sketch for Alexia’s second parasol.

The parasol is such an ubiquitous accessory up through the 1920s. One of the rabbit holes my obsession with the parasol has taken me on is how it was carried. There is, of course, the parasol pocket on 1870s dresses. There are a few examples of this but it isn’t particularly common.

It seems to me that’s it’s more likely to have rigged up some kind of belt and chatelaine holder. But then one would expect more parasols to have hooks in them, which we don’t.

1872 Godeys Oct 1872 Parasol belt & holder

I myself have quite the collection of parasols, you can check them all out over on Retro Rack.

My favorite is a vintage Edwardian tilt parasol.

I use this so much for steampunk events that I created a holster for it out of a pair of cargo shorts.

Speaking of parasols, I’ll be offering up this beauty:

cream lace with royal blue ribbon hand threaded throughout

In a giveaway to my Chirrup members. Sign up here. Opportunity to enter happens when that issue goes out. 

I once received a concerned correspondence froms a member of the Victorian Society and had just attended, of all marvelous things, a parasol covering workshop. I learned some interesting things:

    • early parasol ribs were made of bone, like corsets
    • parasols were particularly popular after the 1860’s as hats began to decrease in size but the pale complexion was still de rigueur
    • handles started out short (under 28″) and grew longer as decades passed, longest during the Edwardian era when the parasol could rest on the floor and handle came up to the lady’s waistline (some parasols had handles that collapsed down for easy storage)
    • early Victorian fashion plates show parasols the size of handkerchiefs, with a 1-to-1 handled-shade ratio, diameters increased over time as well
    • the truly fashionable lady carried a different parasol for each outfit
    • a parasol was one of the most popular gifts for a lover to give his sweetheart, and was often part of the groom’s gift to has new bride
    • they were made from lace, cotton, or silk
    • could be trimmed in anything from silk tassels, to cotton lace, to crystal beads
    • Parasol Language: Carrying it elevated in the left had – desiring acquaintance. Carrying it elevated in the right had – you are too forward.

1905 Fringed Parasol, ca. 1805 via LACMA

Want more behind the scenes sneak peeks? Join the Chirrup

Coop de Book for April is Robin McKinley’s Beauty. (Discussion here.)

LATEST RELEASE

Amazon | Kobo | B&N | iBooks | Direct

Romancing the Werewolf ~ A Supernatural Society Novella by Gail Carriger is now available (audio will follow).

Gay reunion romance featuring your favorite reluctant werewolf dandy, the return of a certain quietly efficient Beta, and some unexpected holiday gifts.

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

A Tiny New York Town With Not One, But 5 Indie Bookstores

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

The Difference Between a Revision, a Rewrite, and a Redraft

Book News:

Quote of the Day:

“A parasol boasts more virtues than the eminently practical one of shading the eyes from the impertinent rays of the sun. It gives an air of smartness to the summer girl.”

~ Parasol quote from a 1909 newspaper

Questions about Gail’s Parasolverse? There’s a wiki for that!


Your Parasol Protectorate Code Name (Parasolverse Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

Recently I posted on the social medias about how to get your Parasol Protectorate code name. (Look, I’ve had a rough weekend, Gentle Reader, girl has to entertain herself somehow.) I could have done a little quiz for it, but I came up with a formula instead.

Here it is:

most frivolous piece of clothing you own

+

favorite food

And here are some gems from the response threads, that I played around with in the Parasolverse.

1924 filmsploitation- Sunshade Styles 2

1924 filmsploitation- Sunshade Styles 2

In Italy, working secretly to undermine the Templars we have:

  • Goggles Lasagna
  • Armored Tiramisu
  • Hoopskirt Caprese
  • Spats Macaroni

Meanwhile in the wild west of the USA a gang of agents attempt to re-unify the natural and the supernatural…

  • Bandana Lampchop
  • Poncho Naan
  • Cozy Artichoke
  • Sequined Enchilada
  • Fascinator Manhattan
  • Flightsuit Burrito
  • Stetson Manchago
  • Trenchcoat Tamale
  • Fedora Curry

In Europe, all is in chaos, the hope of civilized discourse and modest bloodshed rests in the gloved hands of…

  • Pearl Etouffee
  • The Plaid Pecan
  • Petticoat Brulee
  • The Hooded Biscuit
  • NeckFrill Von Goulascz
  • Veil Biscoff
  • Parka Beignet
  • Fluevog Nugget

Around the remnants of the empire, solitary yet diligent (and well shaded) agents work against oppression and anti-supernatural regulations…

  • Tutu Paneer
  • Kimono Nachos
  • Boots Pakora
  • Sarong Gumbo
  • Thigh-high Hamachi
  • Booty Shorts Pho
  • Catsuit Mango

While back in London the remaining agents attempt to infiltrate BUR, promote the Progressive Party line, and generally strive for etiquette, respect, and the Maccon way.

  • Crinoline Lobster
  • Poofy Potatoes
  • Custard Stockings
  • Cardigan Fig
  • Tap Pants Banana Cake

(These could also viably be: mob names, bond girls/villains.)

Of course you don’t have to find your code name this way exactly, you can go with any variation. After all the books feature:

  • Puff Bonnet
  • Wingtip Spectator
  • The Ledger
  • The Ruffled Parasol
  • Hot Cross Bun

None of these really follow the formula, it’s just a jumping off point.

{Gail’s monthly read along for September 2016 is Finders Keepers by Linnea Sinclair.}

SPECIAL RE-RELEASE

MySistersSong_ebook

My Sister’s Song

The warrior Mithra must repel a Roman legion alone and armed only with one very tasty weapon.

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

1930 Oᒪᗪ ᑭᕼOTOᔕ & ᙖᗩᙅOᑎ @photosandbacon 1930s "Chicago the Vacation City" Vintage Travel Poster http-_buff.ly_1mqe7Om

1930 Oᒪᗪ ᑭᕼOTOᔕ & ᙖᗩᙅOᑎ @photosandbacon 1930s “Chicago the Vacation City” Vintage Travel Poster

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

How the Corset Turned into a Girdle

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

The Furry Faces of Bookselling: Bookstore Pets

Book News:

Agatha Sophronia Fan Art from glassical-wearing-fox Dimity Sophronia Fan Art from glassical-wearing-fox Preshea Fan Art from glassical-wearing-fox Sidheag Sophronia Fan Art from glassical-wearing-fox Sophronia Fan Art from glassical-wearing-fox

Finishing School Fan Art from glassical-wearing-fox

Quote of the Day:

“Such a fragile thing, wanting to please someone else. Such endless scope for disappointment and failure.”

~ Glitterland by Alexis Hall

Questions about Gail’s steampunk world? There’s a wiki for that!

Save

Save


Egypt from a Dirigible: Imprudence & Timeless (Parasol Protectorate Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

In Imprudence Rue and her crew visit Egypt just as Alexia and Conall did in Timeless.

Rue goes in for the capital, Cairo, while Alexia spent most of her time in the port city of Alexandria.

Ancient Alexandria

  • Founded by Alexander of Macedon (the Great) c. 332-331 B.C.
  • Located in the Nile delta
  • Renowned for its giant lighthouse – one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, destroyed
  • Library at Alexandria, destroyed
  • Mouseion (of which the library was a part) Ptolomy’s center of science and philosophy
  • Roman catacombs
  • Capital of the country for close to 1,000 years
  • Citadel of Qait Bey, Pompey’s Pillar, the Roman Theater, the Presidential Palace, Montaza Palace, and the Ras el-Tin Palace
  • Additional information on Ancient Vine

Victorian Alexandria

Alexandia shoreline 1882, personal collection

 

 

  • Egypt under the Muhammad Ali Pasha dynasty (1805–1953)
  • Khedivate of Egypt under British patronage ~ specifically Sanctioned khedival rule (1867–1914)
  • Nominally independent Sultanate of Egypt and Kingdom of Egypt, ending with the Revolution of 1952 and the formation of the Republic of Egypt
  • 1882 civil unrest, rebellion

In Imprudence I have one quick reference to the troubles of 1882. I knew of this from my prior research for Timeless. I did a blog post about it at the time, in March of 2011 when we were experiencing the Arab Spring.

Alexandria 1882 landscape rebellion, personal collection

 

From Wikipedia: “Isma’il was succeeded by his eldest son Tewfik, who, unlike his younger brothers, had not been educated in Europe. Tewfik pursued a policy of closer relations with Britain and France but his authority was undermined in a rebellion led by his war minister, Arabi Pasha, in 1882. Arabi took advantage of violent riots in Alexandria to seize control of the government and temporarily depose Tewfik.”

Alexandria 1882, personal collection

 

“British naval forces shelled and captured Alexandria, and an expeditionary force under General Sir Garnet Wolseley was formed in England. The British army landed in Egypt soon afterwards, and defeated Arabi’s army in the Battle of Tel el-Kebir. Arabi was tried for treason and sentenced to death, but the sentence was commuted to exile. After the revolt, the Egyptian army was reorganized on a British model and commanded by British officers.”

Victorians leaving Alexandria by steam ship, 1882, personal collection

 

 

Timeless

In Timeless, Alexia visits Alexandria, in April of 1876 when things are comparatively calm.

The eagle eye will notice that the background for the US cover is actually Cairo, where Alexia never goes in the book. Although I think I added a mention of her stopping over, just to explain away the cover. I’ve no idea what city is depicted in the background of the second omnibus.

Japan set Timeless floating over a rather lush river, it’s possible there are some areas of the Nile that are that green. Generally it’s a bit more bare or palm tree riddled, but I won’t quibble too much. Germany put Alexia back into Cairo.

Nile River
Source

 

Alexandria is all the way off to the left in this image. Cairo is the bottom tip.

 

Imprudence

  • Rue visits my version of steampunk Egypt in October of 1895 during the reign of Tewfik’s son, Abbas II.
  • Sudanese territory has been lost (as the British would think of it) to an Islamic state.
  •  Shortly after Rue leaves in 1896 (Abbas II), a massive Anglo-Egyptian force, under “General Herbert Kitchener, began the reconquest of the Sudan.[12] The Mahdists were defeated in the battles of Abu Hamid and Atbara. The campaign was concluded with the Anglo-Egyptian victory of Omdurman, the Mahdist capital.”
  • At first I was going to take Rue back to Alexandria, partly so I could use Alexia to discuss how the city has changed in the past 20 years. But in Timeless I mention that Lord Maccon purchased property in Cairo for their retirement, well within the plague zone. So I switched Rue’s location to Cairo. Lost a bit of writing time there since I’d already done 2K on Alexandria in a new more steampunky form, but it worked much better for the plot line to be in Cairo, anyway.
  • I scrabbled about for any further Victorian perspectives on Cairo or the rest of Egypt between 1883 ~ 1895. But there appears to be no major issues of civil unrest and in this the British press seems akin to their modern counterparts, which is to say, not particularly interested if there is no blood involved.
  •  I didn’t spend a great deal of time on it as, quite frankly, Rue doesn’t spend a great deal of time in the city. Although I hope you will notice I steampunked Cairo up especially as compared to Alexandria in Timeless. The march of technological advancement is strong with this one.

Modern Alexandria

Alexandria Image #95

 

* second largest city in Egypt
* typical Mediterranean climate: extremely warm/humid days in summer, breezy and cool in the evenings, winter is chilly with rain and hail not uncommon, spring and autumn are best weather.

Mix of ancient and modern.

 

 

Want more behind the scenes sneak peeks? Join the Chirrup

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

carolathhabsburg- Mourning attire. Fashion plate, circa 1894

carolathhabsburg- Mourning attire. Fashion plate, circa 1894

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Bean Back wiskers curled paws2

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

Why We Should Never Underestimate the Intelligence of an Octopus

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  

Female Spies and Gender Bending Soldiers Changed the Course of the Civil War

Quote of the Day:

“Indifference is the revenge the world takes on mediocrities.”

~ Oscar Wilde

Questions about Gail’s steampunk world? There’s a wiki for that!


Deleted Scene From Prudence Featuring Lyall ~ Behind Gail Carriger’s Custard Protocol Series (Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

Hello my dear Gentle Reader,

Here’s a scene that got cut from Prudence (the first Custard Protocol Book) featuring everyone’s favorite beta, Professor Lyall, revealing tidbits about the past the Rue never knew.

Lyall on Lady Maccon & Imprudence Foreshadows

Professor Lyall regarded Quesnel for a moment and then said, without sarcasm, “I see he has his mother’s charm.”
“Is Madame Lefoux charming?” wondered Rue, a little unguarded.
“I believe many find her so. Your mother, for example.”
There was something in his tone. Rue wondered if perhaps Professor Lyall had smoldering his own small torch for her mother and seen Madame Lefoux as a rival for Alexia’s affections. Perhaps that was why he had voluntarily exiled himself to Scotland. Despondent over her parents’ happy union he had retreated north to lick his wounded heart. It was a romantic notion.
She said, testing, “Yes, my mother did very well for a spinster.”
Professor Lyall smiled slightly. “A remarkable woman, your mother.”
“Were you in love with her?”
Professor Lyall only raised up his eyebrows, crossed one leg over the other, and continued sipping his undrinkable tea. “Dear me, no. I haven’t the courage.”
Rue sagged back into her chair. “Then who?”
Professor Lyall examined his fingernails. “Soon enough, I think, we’ll be called back to London and things will change for everyone.”
“What things? Why will they change?”
“You haven’t talked with your father on this subject, your blood father?”
Rue gave him another measured look. “Oh, dear, were you in love with him?”
“Oh really, Rue!” Prim fanned herself with one hand.
Quesnel unsuccessfully tried to hide a grin.
“My dear girl, no one but your mother has that kind of courage.”
“Oh, then what?”
Rue’s prying was interrupted by a loud and sudden snore from Percy, whose chin had fallen all the way down into his cravat. On the inhalation he acquired a mouthful of fine muslin and sputtered.
Despite her eager questions, Uncle Lyall only put down his tea cup and looked cagey.

{Gail’s monthly read along for July 2016 is Poison or Protect by Gail Carriger.}

 

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

1894, Montreal, Canada via shewhoworshipscarlin tumblr

1894, Montreal, Canada via shewhoworshipscarlin tumblr

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

Your Tisane of Smart . . .

The Tea Song – Yorkshire Tea

Book News:

Fan Art Professor Lyall by ~ AtticArt

Fan Art Professor Lyall by ~ AtticArt

Quote of the Day:

“‘There are moments, Jeeves, when one asks oneself, “Do trousers matter?”’

‘The mood will pass, sir.’”

~  P. G. Wodehouse: Very Good, Jeeves

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7 Deleted Scenes for Gail Carriger’s Prudence (Custard Protocol Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

Dear Gentle Reader,

for your amusement here are some deleted scenes from Prudence.

SPOILER ALERT if you haven’t yet read it.

Since this series is currently being written, please be aware that deleted scenes may and often do contain spoilers for this series AND both other series (since this is chronologically last). Read at your own risk.

 Paris – Sur le pont de la Concorde, 1890 via @valmad76 Twitter

Prudence Deleted Scenes

Percy on Rue’s Lightskirt Outfit (the one she wears on the cover)

Percy said, probably just to contradict, because he never noticed such things, “I think she looked smashing.”
“Thank you, Percy.”
“And disease free.”
“Thank you Percy.”
He evaluated her over this spectacles. “With only a touch of the street side doxy.”
“Thank you, Percy!”

Dama & Uncle Biffy Conflict over Shopping with Rue & Primrose

Dama took Prim’s deviance from her mother’s questionable taste as a point of personal pride. When, in fact, Rue suspected Uncle Rabiffano had more of an effect. Uncle Rabiffano was a very odd sort of werewolf. He often shopped with them, and was always open to advise on outfit coordination, hair, and hats. Adoring him as she did, Primrose was wide open to his influence. Fortunately, Uncle Biffy was the most fashionable member of Rue’s father’s household. Which wasn’t saying much, when one considered Lord Maccon and his pack. But was saying a great deal if pitted against Rue’s adopted father and all the drones. Lord Akeldama’s taste was flashy, Uncle Rabiffano’s was elegant. Both girls had adored Dama’s style when they were six, but now they sought Rabiffano’s council and Lord Akeldama’s approval afterward. It was a delicate wardrobe situation that Rue only managed to balance because the two gentlemen lived in separate houses. They both knew, of course, that the other had influence. It took a great deal of wheedling to convince each that the other didn’t have too much influence.

 

Walking dresses in “The Girl’s Own Annual,” 1890 via shewhoworshipscarlin tumblr

Rue’s Mother’s Profession

Her mother’s profession, that of secret preternatural advisor to Queen Victoria, sometime spymaster, and member of the Shadow Council, was supposed to be just that . . . secret. Only Britain’s most respectable vampires and werewolves, and a select handful of progressive politicians, even knew of the Shadow Council’s existence let alone the muhjah. Rue had never quite figured out what her mother specifically did, but it certainly kept said mother busy most nights. Her Paw had once said, not entirely sarcastically, that, “It is a position that allows my darling wife to meddle on as wide a scale as possible. She has the whole Empire to organize and terrorize. Keeps her mostly out of household business, offspring. I should be grateful, if I were you.” Rue had taken this as advise, and given her mother’s personality, been very grateful indeed.

The Many Face of Alexia, T-B, L-R: Japan, Spain, Omnibus, USA, Germany, Manga

Regarding Aunt Ivy’s becoming a vampire, Rue’s birth, & Lady Kingair’s metamorphosis

Rue’s parents had been roundly blamed for all three accidents. But they were collectively so powerful, all the complaining and grumbling was conducted behind their backs. Each ignored accusations of misconduct in their own special way – her mother by willful ignorance, her father by pure cussed obtuseness, and Dama by constant distraction.

Matej Sternen (Sloven artist, 1870-1949).jpg

Lady Kingair in a Pickle

The werewolf’s smile broadened. “Kingair can only act under orders from the Shadow Council when they do not conflict with the brigadier. It is a curious position to be in as a pack, for we are now getting two sets of orders: one from the Dewan at home, to give their agent time, and the other from the brigadier, to rescue his kidnapped wife. Lady Kingair, as you might imagine, is not happy to be placed in this situation. Her position is already tenuous, as a female Alpha she is not permitted official rank in the British Army.”

Percy Doesn’t Like Lady Kingair

“Somehow, I feel he’ll be more forthcoming than my dear little niece.”
“Your niece? Oh, Lady Kingair. Yes, you’re probably right in that. A most disagreeable female.”
“Come now, Percy, was she not instantly enamored of you? How unpleasant to have to earn a lady’s regard for once.” Rue stood, hoping Percy would take the hint. After a moment, he stood as well, gathering up his book and making his way to her door. Rue felt a little bad about her teasing. After all, Prim was right, poor Percy didn’t seek out feminine attention on purpose.

Heat of India

Spoo was napping with the other decklings in her hammock. Above decks was as stiffing as bellow had been. The sun beat down, the day murky with stirred up dust and sediment, the mudflats and waters still. Even the sky rail seemed to be slumbering, the mechanical elephant still and silent above Colaba Station. Everyone waited for the worst of the day’s heat to pass.

“A Stroll on the Beach” by Michael Ancher, 1896 via @MimiMatthewsEsq Tumblr

{Gail’s monthly read along for February 2016 is Terrier: The Legend of Beka Cooper Book 1 by Tamora Pierce.}

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Your Moment of Parasol . . .

 1890-1910 Knut Ekwall – Anne Sophie Ekenmann via history-of-fashion tumblr

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Inspiration, Disinfectant Sunflowers & Praise for Gail Carriger’s Prudence (Behind the Magic of the Custard Protocol)

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

“…author of some of the most pronounced and widely-read tripe ever put on the market.”

~ P.G. Wodehouse

Here’s some background fun bits and bobs for you, to celebrate the release…

On Disinfectant Sunflowers

“The Value of the sunflower as a disinfectant of the atmosphere has been well ascertained, but it seems not yet to be sufficiently appreciated. A German physician, Dr. Valentine, of Frankfort, has published an article on the subject, giving many facts to show that this flower has the property of purifying air laden with marsh miasm, by absorbing the noxious gases, and exhaling out ozonized oxygen. Among other instances, it is mentioned that a Dutch landowner, whose property includes some land on the banks of the Scheldt subject to floods, has planted three or four plots, thirty of forty yards from his house, with the effect of so much improving the air that for ten years no one on his property had been attacked with miasmatic fever, which continued to prevail on the neighboring properties, where similar precautions were not taken. Besides this, as the French Sanitary Commission lately pointed out, the sunflower is a most useful plant. It yields about forty per cent of good oil, the leaves furnish an excellent fodder, and the stem, being rich in saltpetre and potash, makes a good fuel.”

~ Godey’s Lady’s Book and Magazine September 1872

Inspiration behind Prudence

Praise for Prudence

Stacie Penney of The Words Nerds says:

“Honestly, the whole thing pulls together many elements that I really like from Carriger’s novels — women who are in charge, men who admire them, sassy conversations, and devices galore.”

Karissa on Hidden by Pages says:

“I think this is Carriger’s best series yet.”

Candace’s Book Blog says:
“I don’t even know how to put this book to justice. There’s no way I can possibly explain how much I loved this. I loved the humor and the absolute silly ridiculousness. The characters were quirky, fun, delightful, and so much more. It was so well rounded and so well done…”

All About Romance says of the audiobook:

“It took just minutes to realize that Moira Quirk is the perfect narrator for this book, bringing the right sense of humor and tone to every character. Yes, indeed, some are rather over the top – Lord Akeldama most notably – but that’s exactly how Ms. Carriger writes the characters.”

Prudence in Japan

 

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GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

1890s Arthur Hopkins (British artist, 1848-1930) Woman by the Sea

Your Infusion of Cute . . .
Minnesota Brothers Create 18-Foot Snow Octopus

Your Tisane of Smart . . .
10 Surprising Facts About Tea

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  
Examining the Wonderful World of Steampunk: Maritime Terrorists, Time Travelers, and Mad Science

Book News:
JL Dribble says of The Curious Case:

“This story serves as a lovely taste of the shared world of Gail Carriger’s three series, the Parasol Protectorate, Custard Protocol, and Finishing School, in terms of both world-building and writing style.”

Quote of the Day:

“The sort of girl who reduces you to pulp with sixteen sets of tennis and a few rounds of golf and then comes down to dinner as fresh as a daisy, expecting you to take an intelligent interest in Freud.”

~ Carry On, Jeeves by P.G. Wodehouse

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Gail Carriger Fantasy Casts Custard Protocol the Movie (Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

Hello, dear Gentle Reader.

Today I am fantasy casting the crew of the Spotted Custard for you!

One of the questions I often get is how I might dream cast my books. It’s a fun mental exercise, although I’m not married to any casting and pretty open to other people’s thoughts. You can check my Pinterest boards for more options.

Or recommend your own!

My only restriction is that the person be able to do a proper British accent, which, frankly leaves most Americans well out of it. I may not be able to do one myself, but I sure can tell when it’s off. And it drives me bonkers. Anyway, here we go…

Dream cast for Prudence

Rue (Prudence Akeldama): Jessica Brown Findlay

Source

Best known for her tragic role as Lady Sybil in Downton Abby, I chose Jessica Brown Findlay mainly because she can (obviously) do the right upper crust accent for Rue. Also, I think she would have fun with a more upbeat cheerful role.

Rue is often described as round and jolly and while this actress is skinny (aren’t they all?) she has a sweet expressive face which I think could do well for my main character.

Primrose Tunstell: Felicity Jones

Source

Primrose is Rue’s best friend and main confidant. Rue and Prim look a little alike, in fact they use this in their schemes, often pretending to be the rich and feckless “Hisselpenny sisters.” Occasionally, they will even switch names when visiting those who don’t know them by sight (most do know them by reputation).

Primrose is more reserved and interested in manners and organization than Rue. I’m thinking of Felicity‘s portrayal of the sister in Hysteria (Emily Dalrymple) when casting Primrose.

Frankly, given the skill of both the above actresses, I could also see Felicity play Rue and Jessica play Primrose. Another good alternate for either? Daisy Ridley

Percy Tunstell: Simon Woods

Source

I know Simon Woods from Cranford and I was thinking of him as the physical model as I wrote Percy. I don’t know if he is a natural redhead but he looks good as one.

I think he could play the part of stuck up bookish weirdly irresistible Percy beautifully. Although, I bet Tom Felton could also do a great job.

Quesnel Lefoux: Freddie Stroma

Source

Quesnel is French, raised in England, but bilingual and educated in France. I want a really boyish cheerful clownish feel for him, but also an actor able to show strong emotion and sex appeal. Quesnel is at least ten years older than the three other main characters. When I describe him in the books, I was thinking someone like Alex Pettyfer (possibly too pretty?) crossed with young Leonardo DiCaprio. So I basically ended up with Freddie Stroma.

But can he put a tiny hint of French into his accent? That’s the question. If not, one wonders: how good is Vincent Lecoeur’s English? Then again I’ve had a long running affection for Charlie Hunnam (from his Queer as Folk days, naturally) but he’s gotten awfully weather beaten (I blame Sons of Anarchy). Douglas Booth is also lovely.

I guess I am picking lots of Harry Potter actors (or might have-been) because they are all now around the correct age to be the characters in this series. Woe is me.

Tasherit Sekhmet: Indira Varma or Lisa Ray

Source

 

Source

Tasherit Sekhmet is drawn, in my head, off a combination of Nefertiti and Claudia Lynx and a magazine ad for shampoo showing an amazing woman in a robe that I clipped years ago.

I don’t see her as particularly puffy lipped and that seems to be something a lot of Middle Eastern and Indian actresses are getting done these days. A bit disappointing actually, I dithered over casting Priyanka Chopra as a result.

Also Tasherit isn’t cute. Someone like Aishwarya Rai, while utterly stunning, is a bit cute. I like Indira Varma because she is intensely regal, and can do a range of accents. Lisa Ray is also a great option, but can she change her Canadian accent for the role?

Miss Sekhmet is a fun one to cast because she doesn’t have to have a British accent. In fact, I’d welcome a bit of something else hinted as she speaks. Also her origins are unknown. Finally, I could see her played by a range of ages or ethnicities, so long as she has the regal beauty, so I’m not married to the Hollywood attitude of no female on screen after about age 30 (sigh).

Based off a post originally written for My Book, The Movie for Soulless.

{Gail’s monthly read along for February 2016 is Terrier by Tamora Pierce.}

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

1892-1894  The Victoria & Albert Museum

Your Infusion of Cute . . .

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What Are Your Characters Ashamed Of?

Book News:
Leonard Was Hopeful says of The Curious Case:

“Even in this short story, Carriger maintains her kid-glove grip on the “free and indirect discourse” style initiated by Jane Austen; her use of language and tone is always spot-on for the time period.”

Quote of the Day:

“I don’t deserve my friends,” she remarked quietly.

“Sure you do, opal of happiness,” Cleon said. “We’d’ve failed mathematics to a man without you, for one thing.”

~ Tamora Pierce, Squire: Book 3 of the Protector of the Small Quartet

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Victorian Money Means Coins – Research Behind Prudence (Custard Protocol Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

This is one of those blog posts in which I demonstrate the nitty-gritty of research in an aggravatingly nit-picky way.

This is an amended reboot from 2012 when I first started writing Prudence.

Read at your own risk.

To protect the guilty I’m not going to name any names, Gentle Reader, and I’d like to state up front that currency is not my expertise.

However, I was reading a book of the alt-historical romantic variety. The hero visits a whore in Victorian London, 1883.

For her pains he “pulled out far more notes than planned and handed them to her.”

I had to put the book down.

It was very upsetting.

Coins vs. Notes in Victorian England

BANK NOTES!

First, bank notes are drawn on a bank more like a cashier’s check (or an IOU) than paper money today, which means the whore in our above example would have to go into a bank to redeem her notes or find herself a very non-suspicious tradesman, in modern times this is a little like trying to break a $1000 bill.

ON YOUR PERSON?

Second, no one regularly carried notes or paid for anything with notes until well after the 1920s. Culturally, no one would carry that much money into the kind of area of London where whore houses are located.

For services people paid with coin, with tradesmen (who handle goods) the wealthy actually paid via their butler or valet or abigail’s coin, or on account, because it was beneath them to physically touch money.

Even, as the author was trying to get across, this was a highly generous gesture, NOT WITH PAPER MONEY HE WOULDN’T.

*HEAVY BREATHING*

We writers all make mistakes. I have made more than my share. And there comes a time when every historical author must stop researching and begin writing (or the book never gets written).

I do understand and believe that some modernization is necessary in alt-history genre fiction because most readers want their books to be fun and entertaining. It is our business, as authors, to provide that first. (Now for genres like historical fiction or biographies this is a different matter. I am speaking in terms of managing expectations.)

BUT IT’S MONEY

However, I do think something as basic as currency should be second knowledge if you are going to write in any alternate time period. It’s like getting the basic clothing terms correct. (In another unnamed steampunk novel, a corset was referred to as a bodice. FYI, both terms are incorrect. At the time, a corset would have been mainly referred to as stays. The bodice is the top part of a dress. Thus, I spent the entire scene confused into thinking the character in question was swanning around with only her torso dressed, rather than entirely in her underthings as was intended. But, I digress . . .)

A corset AKA stays

Godeys July 1872 Bodices

On Victorian Money (from Baedecker’s London 1896)

  • sovereign or pound (gold) = 20 shillings
  • half-sovereign (gold) = 10 shillings
  • crown (silver) = 5 shillings
  • half-crown (silver) = (2 shillings & a six penny piece)
  • double florin (silver – rare) = 4 shillings
  • florin (silver) = 2 shillings
  • shilling (silver & same size as a sovereign) = 12 pennies
  • six penny (silver) = 6 pennies
  • three penny (silver) = 3 pennies
  • penny (bronze) = 4 farthings
  • half penny = 2 farthings
  • farthing
From lot at auction.

 

I know, I know, overly complicated. Think back to that wonderful scene with the money exchange in Room With a View when Cousin Charlotte comes to visit Lucy’s family.

“In England alone of the more important states of Europe the currency is arranged without reference to the decimal system.”
~ Karl Baedeker, 1896

Victorian Money in Terms of Value

In 1896: 1 sovereign was approximately: 5 American dollars, 25 francs, 20 German marks, or 10 Austrian florins.

To reiterate: The Bank of England issued notes for 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 pounds or more. They were generally not used in ordinary life as most people “dealt in coin.” Gentlemen and ladies, when shopping, either had a servant with them to handle the coin (including gratuities & all fares) or paid on credit (AKA account). A shop would then send a bill around to the townhouse at the end of the month on Black Monday, which would be paid by the house steward, accountant, or personal secretary. A gentleman handling his own money is either no gentleman or engaged in nefarious activities like gambling or trade.

Baedeker advises letters of credit (AKA circular notes) drawn on a major bank for travel, to be exchanged for local currency upon arrival. He also advises never carrying a full days worth of coinage about your person.

It’s important, as historical writers, for us to grasp a larger picture – so allow me to attempt to put this into perspective…

Middle class wages per annum 1850-1890:

  • A Bank of England Clerk £75 to £500
  • Civil Service clerk £80 to £200
  • Post Office clerk £90 to £260
  • Senior Post Office clerk £350 to £500

So let’s say a middle class wage was anything from £75 to £500 a year, that’s £1.44 – £9.61 a week for a relatively comfortable lifestyle.

Since there is no £1 note, to “pull out far more notes than planned” as our unnamed author writes above, and give such to a whore, means at least £5 per note. More than one means at least £10. Not only should this character not have been carrying that kind of money, he just tipped that woman better than one week’s salary for the upper middle class to someone who likely could never break that bill, today that’s something on the order of $2,500.

A gentleman of lower standing, say a younger son with a Living could expect something similar to upper middle class £350-500.

Titled or large landed gentry could pull in anything from £1000 to £10,000 a year (what, you thought the 99% was a new thing?).

A dowry for landed country gentry’s daughter of few means would be about £100 a year.

Still, even the highest aristocrat wouldn’t tip in notes, ever. If for no other reason than it’s the kind of thing the neuvo riche, or An American might do. (It’s worth noting that poor were a great deal poorer, earning shillings per week or less.)

Later on, this same author writes “cost me twenty quid to delay matters” of bribing a coroner to delay a funeral. That’s a heavy bribe, about $5000. I couldn’t find any information on coroner’s pay in Victorian times (the job was either uncommon, not yet official, or went by another name) so let’s say grave digger, which is well below middle class, so a £20 bribe would probably be about a year’s income for the man.

End of Rant

A Budget from 19th Century Historical Tidbits

Sorry, I just had to get that off my chest. Or should I say “out of my chest”? Chink chink.

So, if you have a Victorian setting (really, anything up through the 1920s) what do we pay with?

Yes, that’s right children, coins!

This is also a rather depressingly clear indication of how Gail Carriger spends her weekends. I am such a dork.

“I may be a chump, but it’s my boast that I don’t owe a penny to a single soul – not counting tradesmen, of course.”

~ Carry On, Jeeves by P.G. Wodehouse

As always, you don’t have to take my word for it. Earlier in time, but still relevant podcast…

More or Less Behind the Stats: How Rich was Jane Austen’s Mr Darcy?

How does this relate to Prudence?

Well might you ask. What I had to do (or thought I had to do) was determine the conversion rate between pounds and rupees traveling from England to India in 1895.

Unfortunately, Baedecker didn’t write for India.

What I ended up having to do was make some very loose estimations based on the above assumptions of middle class wages and the information I could source, which was monthly accounts for a household of four living in India on a diplomat’s wage between 1880 and 1897 (something on the order of £500 per annum). Here’s my fun chart:

Here’s hoping the above was, if not fun, at least informative or, if you yourself are an author, helpful.

Prudence by Gail Carriger

Pip pip!

{Gail’s monthly read along for January 2016 is The Raven’s Ring by Patricia Wrede. You do not have to have read any other Lyra books.}

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Your Infusion of Cute . . .
Octopus Candle Holder

Your Tisane of Smart . . .
Knickerbockers for Women: From Under the Hiking Skirts to the Fad of the Hour

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Custard Protocol Easter Eggs ~ Prudence Deleted Scenes (Special Extras)

Posted by Gail Carriger

 

So here are 2  deleted scenes from Prudence the first Custard Protocol book, for your amusement.

Deleted Scenes from Prudence

Since this series is currently being written, please be aware that deleted scenes may and often do contain spoilers for this series AND both other series (since this is chronologically last). Read at your own risk.

Dama & Uncle Rabiffano Conflict over Shopping with Rue & Primrose

Dama took Prim’s deviance from her mother’s questionable taste as a point of personal pride. When, in fact, Rue suspected Uncle Rabiffano had more of an effect. Uncle Rabiffano was a very odd sort of werewolf. He often shopped with them, and was always open to advise on outfit coordination, hair, and hats. Adoring him as she did, Primrose was wide open to his influence. Fortunately, Uncle Biffy was the most fashionable member of Rue’s father’s household. Which wasn’t saying much, when one considered Lord Maccon and his pack. But was saying a great deal if pitted against Rue’s adopted father and all the drones. Lord Akeldama’s taste was flashy, Uncle Rabiffano’s was elegant. Both girls had adored Dama’s style when they were six, but now they sought Rabiffano’s council and Lord Akeldama’s approval afterward. It was a delicate wardrobe situation that Rue only managed to balance because the two gentlemen lived in separate houses. They both knew, of course, that the other had influence. It took a great deal of wheedling to convince each that the other didn’t have too much influence.

 

Rue’s Mother’s Profession

Her mother’s profession, that of secret preternatural adviser to Queen Victoria, sometime spymaster, and member of the Shadow Council, was supposed to be just that . . . secret. Only Britain’s most respectable vampires and werewolves, and a select handful of progressive politicians, even knew of the Shadow Council’s existence, let alone the muhjah. Rue had never quite figured out what her mother specifically did, but it certainly kept said mother busy most nights. Her Paw had once said, not entirely sarcastically, that, “It is a position that allows my darling wife to meddle on as wide a scale as possible. She has the whole Empire to organize and terrorize. Keeps her mostly out of household business, offspring. I should be grateful, if I were you.” Rue had taken this as advice, and given her mother’s personality, been very grateful indeed.

More on the website.

{Gail’s monthly read along for June is: Uprooted by Naomi Novik}

GAIL’S DAILY DOSE

Your Moment of Parasol . . .

Longchamps feathered parasol | Feathers fluff) via fawnvelveteen tumblr

Your Infusion of Cute . . .
Epic underwater harbour chase between an octopus and crab caught on camera

Your Tisane of Smart . . .
A sense of class

Your Writerly Tinctures . . .  
5 Ways to Endear Yourself to Your Book Editor

Book News:
The Book Plank says of Prudence:

“Prudence is an action packed, highly humorous romp of a story and with Rue taking the lead you will definitely be going to different places…”

Quote of the Day:

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